Charging that Vitamin E is Bad for Your Heart, Class Action is Revived Against CVS

vitaminThe First US Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a class action lawsuit against CVS Caremark pharmacies may proceed in light of misleading labels for Vitamin E it sold that say it promotes “heart health” — when studies show the opposite is true.

Plaintiff Ronda Kaufman alleges that one study reflects “that those taking vitamin E had higher rates of heart failure and were more likely to be hospitalized for heart failure,” while another study found “an increase in mortality that progressively increased as daily dosage exceeds 150 IU.” The complaint further states that “[a]ll variations of [CVS’s] pill type vitamin E products exceed the 150 IU level shown to increase mortality in this study.”

No Preemption

The court ruled that the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA), 21 U.S.C. § 343-1(a)(5), does not preempt the lawsuit, brought under New York’s consumer protection law. The case is Kaufman v CVS Caremark Corp. (PDF), 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, No. 16-1199 (Sept. 6, 2016).

Kaufman purchased CVS-brand Vitamin E 400 International Unites (iu) with a label making four statements that are subject to the requirements of FDCA section 343(r)(6): that Vitamin E “supports antioxidant health”; that Vitamin E helps “maintain healthy blood vessels”; that Vitamin E “supports heart health”; and that Vitamin E “supports the immune system.”

Kaufman claims that there exist no scientifically valid studies establishing that CVS’s heart health statements are truthful and not misleading. Most studies about Vitamin E simply presume that it promotes heart health.

In fact, Kaufman cited 7 studies indicating that Vitamin E can even damage the heart. One study found that increasing Vitamin E intake may increase the risk for heart failure. Another found that “high-dosage” Vitamin E supplements of 400 IU or more–the very dosage that Kaufman purchased–may increase all-cause mortality. “This indication, which the studies at least render plausible, would seem to mean that Vitamin E can play a role in harming heart health,” the court says.

Accordingly, the label can plausibly be viewed as misleading within the meaning of the FDCA. “Federal law does not, therefore, preempt application of New York state law for the purpose of holding CVS accountable for misleading consumers by failing to satisfy those requirements,” the court ruled.

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