FDA BANS THE USE OF PELVIC MESH PRODUCTS – How Will This Affect The TVM Litigation?

Will this move by the FDA re-ignite the mass tort engine in TVM litigation or possibly force settlement in Ethicon TVM MDL 2327?

By Mark A. York (April 17, 2019)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) Manufacturers of pelvic synthetic surgical mesh products must stop selling and distributing their products in the United States immediately, the US Food and Drug Administration ordered Tuesday. The surgical mesh is typically used to repair pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and incontinence, but reported side effects have included permanent incontinence, severe discomfort and an inability to have sex.  The key issue with the product for many years is the fact that its made from polypropylene, basically the same material as fishing line.

The FDA said it “has determined that the manufacturers, Boston Scientific and Coloplast, have not demonstrated a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness for these devices.”

The FDA said its April 16, 2019 action to remove surgical mesh products from the market is part of its commitment to ensuring the safety of medical devices. In a November statement, the agency said that it “regulates more than 190,000 different devices, which are manufactured by more than 18,000 firms in more than 21,000 medical device facilities worldwide.”

FDA Release January 4, 2019

FDA strengthens requirements for surgical mesh for the transvaginal repair of pelvic organ prolapse to address safety risks

Summary: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued two final orders to manufacturers and the public to strengthen the data requirements for surgical mesh to repair pelvic organ prolapse (POP) transvaginally, or through the vagina. The FDA issued one order to reclassify these medical devices from class II, which generally includes moderate-risk devices, to class III, which generally includes high-risk devices, and a second order that requires manufacturers to submit a premarket approval (PMA) application to support the safety and effectiveness of surgical mesh for the transvaginal repair of POP.

FDA Finally Takes Action

Each year, thousands of women undergo transvaginal surgery to repair pelvic organ prolapse, a condition where weakened muscles and ligaments cause the pelvic organs to drop lower in the pelvis, creating a bulge or prolapse in the vagina. In the 1990s, gynecologists began implanting surgical mesh for the transvaginal repair of the condition and in 2002, the first mesh device specifically for this purpose was cleared for use by the FDA, according to the agency’s statement.

“We couldn’t assure women that these devices were safe and effective long term,” said Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

For years, medical device companies have stated that the products they are developing and placing into the marketplace are safe and helping patients in the USA and worldwide. That is often not the case and people around the world are suffering.

Medical device makers and compensated doctors have touted FDA approved implants and other devices as the surgical cure for millions of patients suffering from a wide range of pain disorders, making them one of the fastest-growing products in the $400 billion medical device industry. Companies and doctors aggressively push them as a safe antidote to the deadly opioid crisis in the U.S. and as a treatment for an aging population in need of chronic pain relief and many other afflictions.

2017 Pelvic Mesh Study in England Showed High Number of Adverse Events:

Scientific Reports Volume 7, Article number: 12015 (2017) |

Complications following vaginal mesh procedures for stress urinary incontinence: an 8 year study of 92,246 women

Conclusions

Summary: This is the largest study to date of surgical mesh insertions for SUI. It includes all NHS patients in England over an 8-year period. We estimate that 9.8% of patients undergoing surgical mesh insertion for SUI experienced a complication peri-procedurally, within 30-days or within 5 years of the initial mesh insertion procedure. This is likely a lower estimate of the true incidence. Given concerns about the safety of these procedures, this study provides robust data to inform both individual decision-making and national guidance.

Why Device Makers Tout FDA Approvals

  1. “Medtronic receives FDA clearance for two heart devices”
  2. “FDA approves device to help curb cluster headaches”
  3. MRI approved for young infants in intensive care

Manufacturer headlines like these instill consumer confidence that medical devices are safe and effective. After all, they have the FDA’s stamp of approval, right? NO!

The reality is, the FDA seldom requires rigorous evidence that a device works well–and safely–before allowing it onto the market. Medical devices are the diverse array of non-drug products used to diagnosis and treat medical conditions, from bandages to MRI scanners to smartphone apps to artificial hips.

This low standard of evidence applies to even the highest risk devices such as those that are implanted in a person’s body. Surgical mesh, pacemakers and gastric weight loss balloons are just a few examples of devices that have had serious safety problems.

Devices are subject to weaker standards than drugs because they’re regulated under a different law. The Medical Device Amendments of 1976 was intended to encourage innovation while allowing for a range of review standards based on risk, according to legal expert Richard A. Merrill. An array of corporate lobbying has since prompted Congress to ease regulations and make it easier for devices to get the FDA’s approval.

In 2011, an Institute of Medicine panel recommended that the “flawed” system be replaced, because it does not actually establish safety and effectiveness. At the time the FDA said it disagreed with the group’s recommendations.

Defective devices cleared through this system have included hip replacements that failed prematurely, surgical mesh linked to pain and bleeding and a surgical instrument that inadvertently spread uterine cancer.

Bard took the Avaulta implants off the market in 2012 and did the same with the Align inserts in 2016. The company chose to remove the products the day after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2010 ordered Bard and other mesh-manufacturers, including Johnson & Johnson (Ethicon), Boston Scientific and Endo (American Medical S), to review their mesh products, which also resulted in J&J removing four lines of synthetic surgical mesh products from the market. .J&J’s Ethicon subsidiary is facing more than 50 thousand lawsuits regarding its synthetic mesh device in Ethicon (J&J) Pelvic Mesh TVM Litigation MDL-2327.

The Ethicon MDL is in the same West Virginia federal court as the Bard and other mesh manufacturer multidistrict litigation, which are all being heard by Judge Goodwin.  Judge Goodwin has previously expressed his frustration with the parties not engaging in substantive settlements discussions to resolve the thousands of cases, the one option he has is to begin remanding cases back for trial in court venues around the country, possibly forcing both sides to begin earnest settlement talks. Goodwin has held hearings with leadership attorneys from both sides appearing before the court to possibly kickstart settlements. He has gone so far as to warn mesh manufacturers that if they do not settle, U.S. juries appear poised to inflict hundreds of millions, or even billions, of dollars in compensatory and punitive damages on them in thousands of cases that would overload the federal judicial system for years to come.

The FDA forcing mesh manufacturers to stop the use of synthetic mesh is long overdue, and how this action results in renewed interest by mass tort firms across the country, remains to be seen. Regardless, it would seem that Ethicon and the other defendants in the pending TVM litigation that have been unwilling to discuss settlement, may now be forced to deal with the catastrophic consequences of manufacturing and marketing medical devices that have injured untold thousands of patients around the world.

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