C. R. Bard, Inc., Hit With Multimillion Dollar IVC Filter Jury Verdict in Arizona Federal Court

Plaintiff Wins the First Bellwether Trial in Bard IVC Filters Products Liability Litigation MDL 2641

By Mark A. York (March 30, 2018)

Bard G2 Inferior Vena Cava Filter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Mass Tort Nexus Media)  A Phoenix federal jury awarded $2 million in compensatory damages on Friday to plaintiff Sherr-Una Booker, in the first bellwether trial against IVC filter maker Bard, Inc. and affiliate company Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. finding that the clot-stopping vein filter known as a G2 model IVC filter, (an Inferior Vena Cava filter) manufactured by Bard broke apart in her body, and returned a verdict citing that the device maker was responsible for 80 percent of the harm. They also said that Bard is liable for punitive damages in addition to the $2 million in actual damages award, with the hearing on punitive damages taking place right after the initial verdict announcement.

The punitive damages phase of the first bellwether over the IVC device began immediately after the early Friday verdict in the Sherr-Una Booker v. C.R. Bard, Inc et al, Case No. 16-CV-0474-PHX-DCG litigation, US District Court of Arizona in front of Judge David G. Campbell.  The Booker trial is the first “bellwether trial” in the more than 3,500 other IVC filter lawsuits pending in the Bard IVC Filters Litigation MDL 2641, before Judge Campbell. The verdict came fairly quickly after just six-and-a-half hours of deliberations that started Thursday. The jury said Bard was not liable for strict liability, which will probably be appealed by Ms. Bookers counsel. We will update this article with the results of the punitive damage hearing as soon as they become available.

BARD IVC FILTER PROBLEMS

Bard’s IVC filters, including its Recovery, G2, Meridian, and Denali product lines, are the target of over 3,500 injury claims in the Bard IVC Filters Products Liability Litigation MDL 2641 currently pending before the court in the District of Arizona. The thousands of lawsuits  filed against the two Bard companies claim they concealed dangerous side effects associated with their retrievable IVC filters – including filter migration, fracture, organ perforation, embolization, and inferior vena cava punctures – and failed to warn doctors and patients about these risks. In addition to the Bard MDL 2641 cases, there is other litigation against smaller IVC manufacturers, Cordis Corporation Rex Medical, Argon Medical, and B. Braun who are all facing  IVC lawsuits in state and federal courts across the country.

BARD FAILURE TO WARN

IVC filters are implanted into the inferior vena cava – the body’s largest blood vessel – to intercept blood clots before they can travel to the heart and lungs. The devices are indicated for patients at risk for pulmonary embolism, and who are unable to use standard blood-thinning medications. The filters involved in the C.R. Bard and Cook Medical litigations are retrievable, and are intended to be removed once a patient is no longer at risk for pulmonary embolism.

Plaintiffs pursuing IVC filter lawsuits against C.R. Bard and Cook Medical claim that the companies failed to provide doctors with adequate warnings and instructions for removal. They also claim that the devices are defectively designed, and accuse the two companies of concealing the risks associated with their blood clot filters.

The FDA has issued two safety alerts about using retrievable IVC filters.

  • The first was released in August 2010, after the devices were linked to hundreds of adverse events, including reports of filters fracturing and migrating to other areas of the body. In other cases, pieces of the filters perforated organs and blood vessels.
  • The FDA issued a second alert in May 2014 to remind doctors of the importance of IVC filter retrieval. A year earlier, a paper published in JAMA Internal Medicine found only 8.5% of retrievable IVC filters were successfully removed.

“In conclusion, our research suggests that the frequent use of IVC filters for VTE treatment and prophylaxis, combined with a low retrieval rate and inconsistent use of anticoagulant therapy, results in suboptimal outcomes, such as mechanical filter failure and high rates of VTE,” the authors of the report concluded. “More comprehensive longitudinal data would likely identify additional complications.”

Additional research has shown in the last 30 years an estimated 30,000 IVC filters have been implanted. But it wasn’t until 2010, after they’d received thousands of adverse event reports, that the FDA finally issued a warning citing the risk of retrievable filter injuries. It took another four years for the FDA to strengthen the warning when in 2014 they implored doctors to remove IVC filters within about one to two months after the risk of a pulmonary embolism has lessened.

BARD KNEW OF DANGERS

In 2015 after the FDA issued the second IVC warning, a bombshell media report claimed C.R. Bard continued to market and sell their inferior vena cava (IVC) filters even after the company became aware the filters were failing and causing serious injuries and even death. The report went on to link at least 27 deaths and more than 300 injuries to failures associated with C.R. Bards Recovery Model IVC filters. The investigative report also uncovered that IVC devices made by C.R. Bard and Cook Medical had been linked to hundreds of adverse event reports where they punctured the vena cava, tilted out of position or migrated or broke apart and caused metallic fragments to travel to the heart or lungs – a condition known as embolization. Even after C.R. Bard was warned about the problems, they continued to sell the devices, without warning the doctors of the defects and injuries.

With 3,500 additional cases remaining the the Bard IVC Filter litigation docket, it seems that the Bard entities may need to prepare for a long and protracted legal fight, unless they determine settlement discussions are the best legal strategy to prevent future plaintiff wins.

 

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WEEKLY MDL and MASS TORT UPDATE by Mass Tort Nexus (February 2, 2018)

 

Week of January 29, 2018

This Week in Mass Torts Around The Country:

By Mark A. York

 

 

Xarelto MDL 2592: Are Settlement Talks Coming to Xarelto Litigation?

> During the January 30, 2018 monthly status conference hearing in Xarelto products liability MDL No. 2592, US District Court Judge Eldon Fallon stated that this MDL is nearing its end, and “I need to devise an end game,” as he now seems to be pushing both sides toward a resolution. He also referred to selection of cases to remand where 400 cases each will be selected by plaintiff and defense counsel and 400 more by the court, for a total of 1200 cases being designated for remand back to the court of original jurisdiction for trial or settlement.

Full hearing transcript: XARELTO MDL 2592 Judge Fallon January 31, 2018 Hearing Transcript

 Related-Xarelto Docket briefcase: XARELTO MDL 2592 US District Court ED Louisiana Judge Fallon

Opioid Crisis:

See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: OPIOID CRISIS MATERIALS INCLUDING: MDL 2804 OPIATE PRESCRIPTION LITIGATION

>  Insys Therapeutics Sued by New York Attorney General for “Opioid Marketing Abuses” Even After MDL Judge Schedules Settlement Conference Inviting State AG’s

How will Opiate MDL 2805 Judge Polster view NY AG’s suit after he requested states attend his January 31, 2018 full day opioid “settlement” meeting in Cleveland? More than 200 attorneys for city and county governments as well as unions and others met all day in closed door meetings. The day included presentations by non-legal “opioid experts” including Dr. Anna Lembke from Stanford, Dr. Aaron Kesselheim from Harvard Medical School who offered views on the who, how and why the opioid drug makers were able to create the opioid crisis, including how Congress hindered attempts at controlling Big Pharma as well as Joseph Rannazzi, former DEA Head of Diversion Control who spoke to restrictions on DEA enforcement against opioid abuses by drug manufacturers and distributors.  

>New York State Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman on Thursday became the latest attorney general to sue Insys Therapeutics Inc. for allegedly misrepresenting that a spray version of the opioid fentanyl is safe for non-cancer patients and appropriate for mild pain.
Schneiderman alleged in state court that Insys’ marketing of the drug Subsys for unapproved uses caused physicians to overprescribe the treatment, exacerbating the opioid epidemic currently affecting New York and many other states. The MDL judge has stated he wants all parties to come to the settlement table with an open mind, however behind the scenes parties are expressing different views on a quick settlement, since more and more of the suits filed against “Opioid Big Pharma” are RICO claims and some parties want to punish the drug makers for creating the opioid crisis.

 Opioid Indictments:

Pennsylvania Appeals Court Affirms Doctor Conviction For Opioid Prescriptions

 

>A Pennsylvania appeals court panel on Jan. 26 affirmed a doctor’s sentence for illegally prescribing opioid medications and submitting fraudulent bills to insurance companies after finding that the jury was properly instructed about the state’s standards for properly prescribing the drugs (Commonwealth of Pennsylvania v. Lawrence P. Wean, Nos. 1165 EDA 2016, 1167 EDA 2016, Pa. Super., 2018 Pa. Super.

Insys Therapeutics Sales Manager Wants Term “Opioid Crisis” Barred From Trial

>A former Insys Therapeutics Inc employee going to trial for paying kickbacks to doctors to prescribe fentanyl, has requested the court bar U.S. prosecutors from referring to the “opioid crisis” at his trial. Defendant, Jeffrey Pearlman, a former Insys district sales manager , filed a motion asking a Connecticut  federal judge to bar references at his trial to the crisis and evidence the dangers opioids pose. His lawyers cited the “rampant media attention” devoted to opioids, stating  “jurors would likely have strong biases against someone like Pearlman whose company sold and marketed opioids:, even though Pearlman and Insys engaged in rampant illegal sales and marketing of Subsys, the Insys Theraputics, Inc. fast acting fentanyl based opioid drug. . Pearlamn is jusyt one of more than 15 people at Insys to be indicted, including billionaire founder, John Kapoor, and the entire Board of Directors, for marketing off-label prescriptions of Subsys fentanyl spray (United States of America v. Michael L. Babich, et al., No. 16-cr-10343, D. Mass.).

Rhode Island Doctor Pleads Guilty to Taking Kickbacks from Insys Therapeutics, Inc

>A Rhode Island doctor on Oct. 25 pleaded guilty to health care fraud and taking kickbacks for prescribing the opioid Subsys to unqualified patients (United States of America v. Jerrold N. Rosenberg, No. 17-9, D. R.I.).

Related Mass Tort Nexus Opiod Articles:

>California Appeals Court Denies Insurance Coverage For Opioid Drug Makers Defense: Will other insurers say no to opioid coverage? Nov 15, 2017

>Targeting Big Pharma and Their Opiate Marketing Campaigns: Across The USA Nov 3, 2017

For more Mass Tort Nexus Opiod Crisis Information See: Mass Tort Nexus Newsletters and MDL Updates

IVC Filters:

See Bard IVC Filter MDL-2641 Briefcase

510(k) Defense Allowed In Bard IVC Bellwether Trial

>An Arizona federal judge overseeing the C.R. Bard Inc. inferior vena cava (IVC) filter multidistrict litigation on Jan. 29 denied a plaintiff motion to preclude evidence about the devices’ 510(k) clearance in an upcoming bellwether trial, but said he will put the evidence in context and will not allow it to be used as evidence that the devices are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (In Re:  Bard IVC Filters Products Liability Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2641, No. 15-2641, Sherr-Una Booker v. C.R. Bard, Inc., et al., No. 16-474, D. Ariz.)

Cordis IVC Filters:

See Cordis IVC Filter Litigation Alameda County, California Superior Court

>California State Court Cordis IVC Plaintiffs Argue “No Mass Action” To US Supreme Court

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Plaintiffs in an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter case on Oct. 18 told the U.S. Supreme Court that their suggestion of individual bellwether trials does not convert their actions into a mass action under the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA), 119 Stat. 4 (Cordis Corporation v. Jerry Dunson, et al., No. 17-257, U.S. Sup)

Pelvic Mesh:

Boston Scientific TVM Litigation MDL 2362

>Exclusion of 510(k) Defense in Boston Scientific Pelvic Mesh Case:

ATLANTA — The 11th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on Oct. 19 said multidistrict litigation court judge did not err in consolidating four pelvic mesh cases for a bellwether trial and in excluding the so-called 510(k) defense raised by defendant Boston Scientific Corp. (BSC) (Amal Eghnayem, et al. v. Boston Scientific Corporation, No. 16-11818, 11th Cir., 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 20432).

PLAVIX:

See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: PLAVIX MDL 2418 USDC NEW JERSEY

>Plaintiff Loses Plavix Case on Summary Judgment Over Late “Learned Intermediary” Declaration

TRENTON, N.J. — The judge overseeing the Plavix multidistrict litigation on Oct. 26 granted summary judgment in a case after ruling that the plaintiff’s “eleventh hour” declaration by one treating physician did not overcome California’s learned intermediary defense for defendants Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (BMS) and Sanofi-Aventis U.S. Inc. (In Re:  Plavix Products Liability Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2418, No. 13-4518, D. N.J.)

 Hip Implant Litigation

UTAH FEDERAL JUDGE ASK STATE SUPREME COURT “Does Unavoidably Unsafe Apply To Medical Devices”

A Utah federal judge on Jan. 23 asked the Utah Supreme Court whether the state recognizes the unavoidably unsafe product doctrine for medical devices, such as hip implants, as well as drugs  (Dale Burningham, et al. v. Wright Medical Group, Inc., No. 17-92, D. Utah)

Most Wright Profemur Hip Claims Dismissed in Iowa Federal Court Ruling

See: Wright-Medical-Inc-MDL-2329-Conserve-Hip-Implant-Litigation

>An Iowa federal judge on Jan. 26 dismissed most claims in a metal-on-metal hip implant lawsuit and found no personal jurisdiction of Wright Medical Group Inc. (Rebecca Dumler, et al. v. Wright Medical Technology, Inc., et al., No. 17-2033, N.D. Iowa, Eastern Div).

Related Article: Federal Judge Joins Plaintiff Cases in Wright Profemur Hip California Litigation

Diabetes Drugs

Actos Cases Dismissed in California Court: 2014 Global Settlement Applies

>A California federal judge on Jan. 25 dismissed for lack of jurisdiction an Actos class action because the four plaintiffs previously settled their individual claims against the diabetes drug maker Takeda Pharmaceuticals America Inc. (Gary Bernor, et al. v. Takeda Pharmaceuticals America Inc., et al., No. 12-04856, C.D. Calif)

Birth Control

Non-Missouri Plaintiffs Dismissed From Essure Litigation “No Personal Jurisdiction”

>A Missouri federal judge dismissed 92 plaintiffs from a multiplaintiff Essure lawsuit Jan. 24, finding that the court lacked personal jurisdiction over the non-Missouri plaintiffs see Bayer-Essure Missouri Federal Court Order Dismissing All Non- Missouri Plaintiffs Jan 24, 2018 (Nedra Dyson, et al. v. Bayer Corporation, et al., No. 17-2584, E.D. Mo., Eastern Div.)

Mirena IUD:

>2nd Circuit Appeals Court Excludes Mirena MDL Experts—Litigation Terminated

NEW YORK — The Second Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on Oct. 24 affirmed the exclusion of general causation experts in the Mirena multidistrict litigation and a court order terminating the MDL before any trials were held (In Re:  Mirena IUD Products Liability Litigation, Mirena MDL Plaintiffs v. Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Nos. 16-2890 and 16-3012, 2nd Cir)

Related: Federal Court Reopens Mirena IUD Product Liability MDL Nov 3, 2016

Testosterone Replacement Therapy:

See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: TESTOSTERONE MDL 2545 (AndroGel)

>Seventh Circuit Appeals Court: “Premeption Applies to Thousands of Depo-T Cases”

CHICAGO — The Seventh Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on Jan. 19 said a regulatory quirk in how the testosterone drug Depo-T is classified means that thousands of product liability claims involving the drug are preempted (Rodney Guilbeau, et al. v. Pfizer Inc., et al., No. 17-2056, 7th Cir., 2018 U).

>Defense Wins 4th AndroGel MDL Bellwether Trial

An Illinois federal jury on Jan. 26 returned a defense verdict for AbbVie Inc. in the fourth AndroGel multidistrict litigation bellwether trial (Robert Nolte v. AbbVie, Inc., et al., No. 14-8135, N.D. Ill.)

Fosamax MDL 1789:

See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: MDL 1789 Fosamax Products Liability Litigation USDC New Jersey and FOSAMAX MDL 2243 (FEMUR FRACTURE CLAIMS) BRIEFCASE

>Fosamax Plaintiffs Request Supreme Court To Deny Merck Preemption Argument

Counsel for more than 500 Fosamax femur fracture plaintiffs on Oct. 25 urged the U.S. Supreme Court to deny certiorari to Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., arguing that their claims are not preempted by “clear evidence” that the Food and Drug Administration would have rejected stronger warnings for the osteoporosis drug (Merck Sharpe & Dohme Corp. v. Doris Albrecht, et al., No. 17-290, U.S. Sup., 2017 U.S. S. Ct.)

 

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WEEKLY MDL and MASS TORT UPDATE by MASS TORT NEXUS for Week of November 27, 2017

By Mark A. York (November 30, 2017)

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This week in mass torts around the country:

Opioid Crisis: See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: OPIOID CRISIS MATERIALS INCLUDING: MDL 2804 OPIATE PRESCRIPTION LITIGATION

> Superseding indictments of Insys Therapeutics Executives Unsealed in USDC of Massachusetts

BOSTON — A federal indictment against seven high-ranking officers of opioid maker Insys Therapeutics Inc. was unsealed Oct. 26 in a Massachusetts federal court charging the men with racketeering, mail fraud and conspiracy for a scheme to pay kickbacks to doctors for, and to fraudulently induce health insurers into approving, off-label prescriptions for the company’s addictive Subsys fentanyl spray (United States of America v. Michael L. Babich, et al., No. 16-cr-10343, D. Mass.).

>Doctor Pleads Guilty To Opioid Health Care Fraud, Taking Kickbacks From Insys

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A Rhode Island doctor on Oct. 25 pleaded guilty to health care fraud and taking kickbacks for prescribing the opioid Subsys to unqualified patients (United States of America v. Jerrold N. Rosenberg, No. 17-9, D. R.I.).

 > Opioid Distributors Support MDL While Municipalities Oppose

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The “Big Three” national drug distributors on Oct. 20 told a federal judicial panel that they support centralization of more than 60 opioid lawsuits filed against them by various cities and counties (In Re:  National Prescription Opiate Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2804, JPML).

Related Mass Tort Nexus Opiod Articles:

>California Appeals Court Denies Insurance Coverage For Opioid Drug Makers Defense: Will other insurers say no to opioid coverage? Nov 15, 2017

>Targeting Big Pharma and Their Opiate Marketing Campaigns: Across The USA Nov 3, 2017

For more Mass Tort Nexus Opiod Crisis Information See: Mass Tort Nexus Newsletters and MDL Updates

IVC FILTERS:

Cook Medical IVC: See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: Cook Medical IVC Filter MDL 2570

>First Cook IVC Bellwether Trial Starts in USDC SD of Indiana

INDIANAPOLIS — The first bellwether trial in the Cook Medical Inc. inferior vena cava (IVC) filter multidistrict litigation got under way on Oct. 23 in Indianapolis federal court (In re:  Cook Medical, Inc., IVC Filters Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2570, No. 14-ml-2570, Elizabeth Jane Hill v. Cook Medical, Inc., No. 14-6016, S.D. Ind., Indianapolis Div.).

Cordis IVC Filters: See Cordis IVC Filter Litigation Alameda County, California Superior Court

>Cordis IVC Filter Plaintiffs Tell Supreme Court Trial Proposal Is No ‘Mass Action’

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Plaintiffs in an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter case on Oct. 18 told the U.S. Supreme Court that their suggestion of individual bellwether trials does not convert their actions into a mass action under the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA), 119 Stat. 4 (Cordis Corporation v. Jerry Dunson, et al., No. 17-257, U.S. Sup., 2017 U.S. S. Ct. Briefs LEXIS 4013).

Taxotere: See Taxotere MDL 2740 (US District Court Eastern District of Louisiana)

>Taxotere MDL Judge Denies Statute of Limitations Motion by Sanofi

NEW ORLEANS — The Louisiana federal judge overseeing the Taxotere multidistrict litigation on Oct. 27 denied without prejudice a motion by defendant Sanofi-Aventis U.S. LLC to dismiss claims barred by applicable statutes of limitations (In Re:  Taxotere [Docetaxel] Products Liability Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2740, No. 16-md-2740, E.D. La.).

Pelvic Mesh: Boston Scientific TVM Litigation MDL 2362

>Exclusion of 510(k) Defense in Boston Scientific Pelvic Mesh Case:

ATLANTA — The 11th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on Oct. 19 said multidistrict litigation court judge did not err in consolidating four pelvic mesh cases for a bellwether trial and in excluding the so-called 510(k) defense raised by defendant Boston Scientific Corp. (BSC) (Amal Eghnayem, et al. v. Boston Scientific Corporation, No. 16-11818, 11th Cir., 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 20432).

PLAVIX: See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: PLAVIX MDL 2418 USDC NEW JERSEY

>Plaintiff Loses Plavix Case on Summary Judgment Over Late “Learned Intermediary” Declaration

TRENTON, N.J. — The judge overseeing the Plavix multidistrict litigation on Oct. 26 granted summary judgment in a case after ruling that the plaintiff’s “eleventh hour” declaration by one treating physician did not overcome California’s learned intermediary defense for defendants Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (BMS) and Sanofi-Aventis U.S. Inc. (In Re:  Plavix Products Liability Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2418, No. 13-4518, D. N.J., 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 177588).

Abilify MDL 2734: Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: Abilify MDL 2734

 >Abilify MDL Judge Orders Defendants To Name Settlement Counsel

PENSACOLA, Fla. — The Florida federal judge overseeing the Abilify multidistrict litigation on Oct. 25 ordered the defendants to engage settlement counsel for monthly settlement conferences (In Re:  Abilify [Aripiprazole] Products Liability Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2734, No. 16-md-2734, N.D. Fla., Pensacola Div.).

Mirena IUD: Related-Federal Court Reopens Mirena IUD Product Liability MDL Nov 3, 2016

>2nd Circuit Affirms Exclusion Of Mirena MDL Experts, Termination Of Litigation

NEW YORK — The Second Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on Oct. 24 affirmed the exclusion of general causation experts in the Mirena multidistrict litigation and a court order terminating the MDL before any trials were held (In Re:  Mirena IUD Products Liability Litigation, Mirena MDL Plaintiffs v. Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Nos. 16-2890 and 16-3012, 2nd Cir., 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 20875).

Hip ImplantsSee Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: Wright Medical, Inc. MDL 2329 Conserve Hip Implant Litigation

>Wright Medical Settles Remaining Wright Hip Cases; Judge Closes MDL 2329

ATLANTA — Wright Medical Technology Inc. and plaintiffs in a multidistrict litigation have entered two additional agreements settling the remainder of the litigation, a Georgia federal judge said Oct. 18 (In Re:  Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Conserve Hip Implant Products Liability, MDL Docket No. 2329, No. 12-md-2329, N.D. Ga., Atlanta Div

Testosterone Replacement Therapy: See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: TESTOSTERONE MDL 2545 (AndroGel)

>Testosterone Bellwether Out and Pre-emption Denied

CHICAGO — An Illinois multidistrict litigation judge on Oct. 23 granted summary judgment in one of two testosterone replacement therapy bellwether cases but denied preemption in the second case (In Re:  Testosterone Replacement Therapy Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2545, No. 14-1748, N.D. Ill., Eastern Div., 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 176522).

 

>AbbVie, AndroGel Plaintiff Spar Over Mixed Verdict In 1st Bellwether Trial Verdict

CHICAGO — AbbVie on Oct. 25 urged the judge overseeing the testosterone replacement therapy multidistrict litigation to not disturb a bellwether trial verdict where a jury awarded $0 compensatory damages (In Re:  Testosterone Replacement Therapy Products Liability Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2545, No. 14-1748, Jesse Mitchell v. AbbVie, No. 14-9178, N.D. Ill.).

Fosamax MDL 1789: See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: MDL 1789 Fosamax Products Liability Litigation USDC New Jersey

>Fosamax Femur Plaintiffs Urge Supreme Court To Deny Preemption Review

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Counsel for more than 500 Fosamax femur fracture plaintiffs on Oct. 25 urged the U.S. Supreme Court to deny certiorari to Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., arguing that their claims are not preempted by “clear evidence” that the Food and Drug Administration would have rejected stronger warnings for the osteoporosis drug (Merck Sharpe & Dohme Corp. v. Doris Albrecht, et al., No. 17-290, U.S. Sup., 2017 U.S. S. Ct. Briefs LEXIS 4064

 

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3,700 IVC Filter Lawsuits Filed Against Bard and Cook Medical

Bard G2 Express IVC Filter
Bard G2 Express IVC Filter

Cook Medical, Inc. and C.R. Bard, Inc. continue to face mounting lawsuits over their retrievable IVC filters, with 3,769 cases filed against the companies in two federal MDLs.

Cook Medical is a defendant in at least 1,918 product liability claims involving its Gunther Tulip and Celect IVC filter blood clot filters. IN RE: Cook Medical, Inc., IVC Filters Marketing, Sales Practices and Products Liability Litigation is pending before US District Chief Judge Richard L. Young in MDL 2570 in the Southern District of Indiana.

In March 2017, Judge Young ordered both sides to appear at three hearings with a proposed settlement framework.

Bard’s IVC filters, including its Recovery, G2, Meridian, and Denali product lines, are the target of 1,851 injury claims. IN RE: Bard IVC Filters Products Liability Litigation is pending before US District Judge David G. Campbell in MDL 2641 in the District of Arizona.

On March 21, 2017, Judge Campbell appointed the Plaintiffs’ Co-Lead/Liaison Counsel and State/Federal Liaison Counsel:

  • Ramon R. Lopez, Lopez McHugh, LLP, Newport Beach, CA.
  • Mark S. O’Connor, Gallagher & Kennedy, PA, Phoenix, AZ.

Failure to Warn

IVC filters are implanted into the inferior vena cava – the body’s largest blood vessel – to intercept blood clots before they can travel to the heart and lungs. The devices are indicated for patients at risk for pulmonary embolism, and who are unable to use standard blood-thinning medications. The filters involved in the C.R. Bard and Cook Medical litigations are retrievable, and are intended to be removed once a patient is no longer at risk for pulmonary embolism.

Plaintiffs pursuing IVC filter lawsuits against C.R. Bard and Cook Medical claim that the companies failed to provide doctors with adequate warnings and instructions for removal. They also claim that the devices are defectively designed, and accuse the two companies of concealing the risks associated with their blood clot filters.

The FDA has issued two safety alerts about using retrievable IVC filters.

  • The first was released in August 2010, after the devices were linked to hundreds of adverse events, including reports of filters fracturing and migrating to other areas of the body. In other cases, pieces of the filters perforated organs and blood vessels.
  • The FDA issued a second alert in May 2014 to remind doctors of the importance of IVC filter retrieval. A year earlier, a paper published in JAMA Internal Medicine found only 8.5% of retrievable IVC filters were successfully removed.

“In conclusion, our research suggests that the frequent use of IVC filters for VTE treatment and prophylaxis, combined with a low retrieval rate and inconsistent use of anticoagulant therapy, results in suboptimal outcomes, such as mechanical filter failure and high rates of VTE,” the authors of the report concluded. “More comprehensive longitudinal data would likely identify additional complications.”

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Bard Seeks Summary Judgment in IVC Filter MDL with Novel Preemption Argument

Bard IVC filter
IVC filters cause injuries from migration downward and upward. The IVC Filters can also tilt or shift, making them almost impossible to remove.

In a gambit to dismiss 1,700 lawsuits against its IVC filter, CR Bard is pressing a novel argument that the FDA’s quickie 510(k) approval process has become more rigorous, thus entitling it to a ruling that the plaintiffs’ state-law claims are preempted by federal law.

The argument is a stretch because courts have often declined to hold claims preempted where medical devices were cleared under the shortcut 510(k) process, as opposed to the more rigorous premarket approval (PMA) process.

All of Bard’s IVC filters involved in MDL 2641 – the Recovery, G2, G2, Express, G2 X, EclipseTM, Meridian, and Denali Filters — got approval via the lenient 510(k) process. The case is IN RE: Bard IVC Filters Products Liability Litigation, Case No. 2:15-MD-02641-DGC before US District Judge David G. Campbell in Arizona.

Changed greatly?

Bard argues in its summary judgment motion that the plaintiff’s master long and short form complaints, asserting state-law claims, are expressly and impliedly preempted by federal law.

FDA approval through Sec. 510(k) of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 merely requires that a new device is “substantially equivalent” to a predicate device — but not a review of its safety or efficacy as would happen in a premarket approval application (PMA).

“The 510(k) program has changed greatly since Lohr (Medtronic v. Lohr, 518 U.S. 470 (1996),” Bard argues. “In 1990, Congress dramatically altered the 510(k) process in section 12 of the SMDA (Safe Medical Devices Act). The language expressly linked FDA substantial findings to “safety” and “efficacy”/”effectiveness”:

[T]he term “substantially equivalent” or “substantial equivalence” means . . . that the device . . . (ii)(1) has different technological characteristics and the information submitted . . . contains information, including clinical data if deemed necessary by the Secretary, that demonstrates that the device is as safe and effective as a legally marketed device, and (II) does not raise different questions of safety and efficacy than the predicate device.

Bard says that in its 510(k) approvals:

  • The FDA required compliance with special controls.
  • FDA required Bard to conduct clinical studies of its filters.
  • FDA required additional testing, labeling, and other information during its review.

“These device-specific guidances are intended to address specific risks or issues related to specific devices or device types, and where, as here, FDA has required manufacturers to follow them, they become device-specific federal requirements entitled to preemptive effect,” Bard asserts.

Bard quotes an FDA  2010 Working Report, saying that “the 510(k) program has changed significantly since its inception…. Through various statutory and regulatory modifications over time, it has become a multifaceted premarket review process that is expected to assure that cleared devices, subject to general and applicable special controls, provide reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness, and to facilitate innovation in the medical device industry.”

Similar argument failed

A similar argument failed in a motion for summary judgment by Janssen in IN RE: Xarelto (Rivaroxaban) Products Liability Litigation. In that case, US District Judge Eldon Fallon ruled:

“The Court in Levine [Wyeth v. Levine, 555 U.S. 555 (2009)] held that a state failure to warn claim against a brand-name drug manufacturer was not preempted by federal law, finding that Congress had clearly intended the judicial branch to work in concert with the FDA to protect against unnecessary risk,” the court held.

The judge added, “The court in Guidry [Guidry v. Janssen Pharms., Inc., No. 15-4591, 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 115447, at *48 (E.D. La. Aug. 29, 2016)], relying on Wyeth, found that Plaintiff’s pre-market defective design claims under the LPLA [Louisiana Products Liability Act] were not preempted. “Federal law does not prevent a drug manufacturer from complying with this state-imposed duty before seeking FDA approval. Far from impossible, the two are complimentary, preferable, and perhaps necessary to protect the public health and assure the safety, effectiveness, and reliability of drugs.”

Plaintiffs argue that IVC filters cause injuries as follows:

  • Migration downward and upward. The IVC Filters can tilt or shift, making them almost impossible to remove.
  • Device fracture, causing blood clots (embolism) in the heart, lung, liver and kidneys. Research shows that the devices experienced fracture rates of 37% to 40% after five and a half years.
  • Perforation, where stress on the IVC Filter struts leads to fractures that puncture adjacent organs and vessels.

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More than 1,000 Product Liability Lawsuits Filed Against Bard Meridian IVC Filter

Virginia Bard Meridian IVC Filter LawsuitMore than 1,000 actions have been filed against C.R. Bard, Inc. about its defective Meridian IVC Filter in litigation consolidated in Arizona federal court before US District Judge David G. Campbell.  The C.R. Bard IVC Filter Litigation MDL 2641 was created on August 17, 2015.

The latest case is filed by Aleasia J. P., a woman from Virginia who was implanted with the C.R. Bard Meridian® Vena Cava Filter on October 12, 2012 at a hospital in Virginia. The action was filed on November 8, 2016 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona, Case No. 2:16-cv-03871.

Knew device was defective

Bard no longer manufactures or sells the Meridian in the United States. Product liability and injury lawsuits filed against Bard, Cordis and other retrievable IVC filter makers allege that these companies knew or should have known that the devices were defective because:

  • The defendants failed to conduct proper testing, including human clinical testing, to determine how the devices actually functioned in the body.
  • Published medical studies have found many complications including fracture, device migration, perforation of the vena cava wall, organ penetration, and increased risk for venous thrombosis.
  • The defendants misrepresented the risks with retrievable ICVs and failed to issue appropriate safety warnings to patients and physicians.

Meridian is a temporary filter that consists of 12 needle-like legs arranged in a cone-shape around a central hook. It is implanted in a major blood vessel called the inferior vena cava (IVC) to catch blood clots and prevent pulmonary embolisms

Meridian was approved by the FDA in 2011 with a 510(k) application, which means it did not go through clinical trials because it was “equivalent” to several other IVC filters made by C.R. Bard. Unfortunately, these other filters have been linked to serious risks.

Meridian is similar to the Recovery, which was introduced in 2003 and withdrawn in the market in 2005. In 2012, a study of 363 patients estimated that 40% would fracture within 5.5 years. See Class Action Charges Company Lied to Cover Up Defective Bard IVC Filter

Meridian is also very similar to the G2, which C.R. Bard introduced in 2005 to replace the Recovery. In June 2014, a study of 829 patients implanted with the G2 estimated that 38% would fracture within 5 years, with the risk increasing over time.

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Considerations for Plaintiff Attorneys when Starting a Successful Mass Tort Practice

John Ray
John Ray

Mass Tort Litigation has emerged as the only effective check on pharmaceutical and medical device companies that make dangerous products injuring thousands of Americans. Mass tort attorneys have filed 140,000 lawsuits in 250 federal multidistrict litigation dockets as of September 2016.

Many attorneys are expanding their personal injury practices to include mass torts because the US Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation has organized the litigation so effectively against the multi-billion-dollar drug and medical device industry.

“The FDA is not a check or a balance on the pharmaceutical industry,” said Mass Tort Nexus Consultant John Ray, recently teaching a four-day course about mass torts in Fort Lauderdale, FL. “Plaintiff attorneys are the only check on the pharmaceutical industry.”

In recent years mass tort lawyers have recovered $10 billion in settlements for injured Americans: $4.8 billion for Vioxx, $1.8 billion for Yaz, $1.3 billion for the Stryker hip and $2.5 billion for the DePuy hip.

“The drug companies bake these cases into their business model,” Ray said. “Defendants call it a win when they don’t put a warning on their labels, don’t get sued and don’t have to pay a judgment at all. This means they got away with it. That happens a lot.”

When a federal MDL is created, the supervising judge will approve a standard short-form or long-form complaint, plus a plaintiffs’ fact sheet which replaces interrogatories. The consolidation of cases means that a mass tort lawyer can file a notice of appearance and file cases regardless of the jurisdiction of the plaintiff, defendant company or the location of the plaintiff’s attorney.

Criteria for a viable case

Cases that are attracting many mass tort attorneys now involve Xarelto, IVC filters and Pradaxa. Among the many factors determining the viability of a mass tort are:

  • Preemption. Congress has expressly preempted certain claims. Further, courts have ruled that generic manufacturers cannot be sued.
  • Statute of limitations: State laws govern when the statute of limitations starts to run, but in most federal litigation, the date that the FDA issues a “black box warning” for a drug marks the date when the time limit begins to run.
  • Legal viability. In many cases, research will show a connection between a drug and injuries among patients, but specific causation must be proved in a trial. Experts must be found who will survive a Daubert motion to disqualify.
  • Financial viability of the defendant. While Johnson & Johnson had $46.8 billion in annual income in 2015, some small makers of IVC filters went out of business before they could sell one.
  • Average case value. The average Pradaxa case settled for $160,000 in 2014, with some settlements valued up to $500,000, according to a grid created by US District Judge David R. Herndon.
  • Plaintiff numerosity. Cases in the Syngenta Corn Market Crash Litigation involve every corn producer in America, and IVC Filters have been implanted in millions of patients over the last 40 years.
  • Cost per client acquired. Costs can add up with Facebook advertising, website marketing, and lead generation companies. For example, The Sentinal Group will advertise for clients for a fee of $100,000 to obtain 250 calls for Xarelto plaintiffs, with 1 out of 5 calls leading to a signed client.
  • Case duration. Mass torts are litigation for the long haul, with the average case lasting 5 years and 4 months before settlement, according to Ray, with 7 years being a good benchmark for the duration of a case.
  • Case value. An example of a good outcome is with Pradaxa. The average settlement is $162,000. Calculating 40% in gross contingent fees would equal $64,800. Another 7% is deducted ($4,536) for the common benefit to pay the steering committee. Of the remaining fee of $60,204, a 40% referral fee of $24,015 is deducted for the co-counsel that handled the litigation. This leaves a net fee of $36,189 for the attorney who originated the case.
  • Financial resources. Costs to fund a case can be in the tens of thousands of dollars, with costs reaching hundreds of thousands for members of the plaintiffs steering committee.
  • Personnel resources. A law firm will have to train a small army of intake specialists to answer incoming calls when advertising is running. Additional personnel will be needed to obtain and review medical records.

Perfect timing

There are three phases of mass tort litigation, and perfect timing will be needed to enter a particular case.

Emerging Phase Cases. In this early phase, the cost to acquire a client is the least expensive, but there many issues of case viability. For example, the courts are still considering motions to consolidate cases involving Abilify and Roundup. With Abilify the FDA has issued a safety warning but not a black box warning. With Roundup the EPA has not classified the herbicide as a carcinogen, but foreign governments have.

Litigation Phase Cases. It is considered an ideal time to enter into a mass tort when the JPML has created a multi-litigation docket (MDL). Some 250 MDLs include mature litigation involving Benicar, Lipitor, Viagra, Xarelto and Zofran, and many legal issues have been settled. The supervising judge will schedule bellwether or test cases for trial.

Settlement Phase Cases. This is the very safest time to enter litigation because all an attorney must do is find qualified plaintiffs. Example cases involve transvaginal mesh, Levaquin and Pradaxa. However at this late phase the cost to acquire a client is at its highest.

“Whatever you do, maintain your single-event plaintiff’s practice,” Ray advised. “You will have to keep paying the costs of a mass tort case until it settles, and you will need a huge cash supply or credit line.”

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Bard Can Look Into Plaintiffs’ Communications With FDA Regarding IVC Filters

Bard Denali IVC Filter
Bard Denali IVC Filter

US District Judge David G. Campbell overseeing the C.R. Bard IVC filter multidistrict litigation ruled on Sept. 6 that the company can conduct discovery into the plaintiffs’ alleged efforts to influence the Food and Drug Administration.

But the company cannot inquire into the plaintiffs’ communications with NBC Nightly News or third-party litigation funding. The case is In Re: Bard IVC Filters Products Liability Litigation, MDL Docket No. 2641 in Arizona.

Bard said in its motion that it wants to discover any role plaintiffs or their counsel had with the FDA that may have biased the agency, that may reflect improper motivation for the letters and that signals that the letters lack “trustworthiness” for admissibility.

Bard also said five NBC Nightly News stories about Bard’s IVC filters have become the “focal point” for the plaintiffs and they have interviewed Bard witnesses after their appearance in the stories. Bard said the plaintiffs’ communications with NBC could have biased the stories and are thus relevant to Bard’s defense.

No Work Product Protection

Judge Campbell ordered the plaintiffs to respond to interrogatories about their contact with the FDA. He said the requests are relevant to the defense and “proportional to the needs of the case.”

“Plaintiffs have placed and will continue to place much emphasis on the FDA letters, and information regarding Plaintiffs’ role in securing those letters or otherwise influencing the FDA’s actions is plainly relevant to the defense,” the judge wrote.

The plaintiffs argued that the FDA information would be hearsay, but the judge said “information need not be admissible in evidence to be discoverable under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 26(b)(1).”

“Plaintiffs claim that their communications with the FDA are protected work product because they reveal mental impressions and strategies of counsel, but courts have widely held that communications with government regulators that might prompt government action that could prove beneficial in private litigation waive any work product protection,” the judge said.

As to discovery into the NBC stories, Judge Campbell denied the motion because the plaintiffs assured the court that the stories will not be used at trial.

There are 810 cases in the MDL.

For recent news developments, read:

Proof! C. R. Bard, Inc. has been Settling IVC Filter Cases

IVC Filter Cases Settling Quietly as Litigation Grows

 

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Proof! C. R. Bard, Inc. has been Settling IVC Filter Cases

bard-ivc-filter-lawsuit-2As suspected, C.R. Bard, Inc. has indeed been settling IVC Filter cases, according to the 10-Q statement it filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 30.

“During the second quarter of 2013, the company finalized settlement agreements with respect to more than 30 Filter Product Claims and made payments with respect to such claims within the amounts previously recorded by the company,” the 10-Q states on page 13.

The information had not previously been made public.

Importantly, it also states, “…the company intends to vigorously defend Filter Product Claims that do not settle…” In other words, it will not defend cases that settle, thereby admitting that it is settling cases. The statement repeats word-for-word what the company said earlier in its 10-Q filing  dated September 2015 .

Mass Tort Expert John Ray said, “Bard has issues that will cause it to settle sooner rather than later. Bard got a lot of bad press about what they knew and when they knew it. Bottom line, Bard is going to settle, and they threw up the white flag in this statement to stockholders.” See IVC Filter Cases Settling Quietly as Litigation Grows.

770 plaintiffs

Bard IVC Filter Litigation is consolidated in MDL 2641, which was created in US District Court in Arizona in August 2015. The company faces 770 plaintiffs who have filed product liability cases over the company’s inferior vena cava (IVC) filter products. The company revealed:

  • Approximately 660 of the Filter Product Claims have been, or shortly will be, transferred to the IVC Filter MDL.
  • The additional 110 Filter Product Claims are pending in various state courts.
  • In March 2016, a Canadian class action was filed against the company in Quebec.
  • In April 2016 and May 2016, Canadian class actions were filed in Ontario and British Columbia, respectively.
  • This does not include approximately 40 claims that have been threatened against the company but for which complaints have not yet been filed.
  • The company expects that additional trials of Filter Product Claims may take place over the next 12 months.

The blood clot filters have been inserted in millions of patients over the last 40 years.

“All these products are defective,” Ray said, speaking in a webinar presented by The National Trial Lawyers. “I cannot say that one product is less defective than other.”

While specific settlements are suppressed by non-disclosure agreements, Ray said that a wrongful death case involving an IVC filter has a settlement value of $500,000. At the other extreme, a case involving the successful removal of an IVC filter without complications has a settlement value of $10,000.

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IVC Filter Cases Settling Quietly as Litigation Grows

ivc filter2Manufacturers of defective IVC filter medical devices are settling cases behind the scenes, as litigation is building nationwide. The blood clot filters have been inserted in millions of patients over the last 40 years.

“All these products are defective,” said mass tort expert John Ray of Ft. Lauderdale, speaking in a webinar presented by The National Trial Lawyers. “I cannot say that one product is less defective than other.”

While specific settlements are suppressed by non-disclosure agreements, Ray said that a wrongful death case involving an IVC filter has a settlement value of $500,000. At the other extreme, a case involving the successful removal of an IVC filter without complications has a settlement value of $10,000.

  • Bard IVC Filter Litigation is consolidated in MDL 2641 in US District Court in Arizona. Bard essentially announced that it was settling cases in its September 2015 10-Q filing, where it stated, “While the company intends to vigorously defend Filter Product Claims that do not settle, including through litigation, it cannot give any assurances that the resolution of these claims will not have a material adverse effect on the company’s business…”  Ray says, “Bard has issues that will cause it to settle sooner rather than later. Bard got a lot of bad press about what they knew and when they knew it. Bottom line, Bard is going to settle, and they threw up the white flag in this statement to stockholders.”
  • Cook Medical IVC Filter Litigation is consolidated in MDL 2570 in US District Court for the Southern District of Indiana. The defendants are Cook Medical, LLC and Cook Inc., both of Bloomington, IN, and William Cook Europe APS, Bjaeverskov, Denmark. “There are many stipulated dismissals where no motion to dismiss has been filed,” Ray says. “Generally when you see this, the company is settling cases, but doing so privately. Will there be a mass settlement? Probably. But I am 99% sure that they have already settled a lot of cases.”
  • Cordis IVC Filter Litigation is centered in the California state courts, where hundreds of cases are up for consolidation. Cordis Corporation is organized under the laws of Florida, with its principal place of business in Fremont, California. According to Ray, plaintiffs can file cases there regardless of the original jurisdiction.
  • There is no MDL for Boston Scientific Corp IVC Filter Litigation. “We believe it is possible that more cases will be filed and a motion for consolidation and transfer may be formed in an effort to form an MDL,” says Mass Tort Consultant John Ray.
  • Similarly, there is no MDL for cases against Rex Medical and Argon Medical. Plaintiffs have filed cases in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas before Judge Arnold New, who has assigned them to the complex litigation track.

How were defective devices approved?

Ray said he solved the puzzle about how a group of medical devices so inherently defective won approval from the FDA. “It was a matter of timing,” he says. The first IVC filters were on the market prior to regulation by the Medical Device Act of 1976. The first IVC filter was approved using the 510(k) shortcut. “Once the first device was approved, every other device had a predicate device. They were all approved without ever being tested, without proving their satefy, without proving their efficacy.”

IVC filters are small, cage-like devices that are inserted into the inferior vena cava – a major vein leading directly to the heart. They were supposed to capture blood clots and prevent them from reaching the lungs.

However, attorney John Dalimonte of Boston identified three issues with the Cook Tulip and Celect IVC Filters.

  • Migration downward and upward. The IVC Filters can tilt or shift, making them almost impossible to remove.
  • Device fracture, causing blood clots (embolism) in the heart, lung, liver and kidneys. Research shows that the devices experienced fracture rates of 37% to 40% after five and a half years.
  • Perforation, where stress on the IVC Filter struts leads to fractures that puncture adjacent organs and vessels.

“There are a lot of cases out there,” Dalimonte says, because the manufacturers conducted off-label marketing directly to bariatric patients, trauma patients and orthopedic surgery patients.

He will be part of the panel of the September Mass Tort Nexus Course. John serves on the Steering Committee for the Bard and Cook MDLs. Contact barbara@masstortnexus.com or (954) 383-3932 for information on the September Course.

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