Pradaxa Federal Court Trial Win: $1.25 million verdict-with punitives of $1 million in death case

Betty Erelene Knight (Deceased), Claude R. Knight   vs. Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  Docket No. 3:15-cv-06424; Judge Robert C. Chambers (United States District Court-Southern District of West Virginia)

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) A federal jury has awarded the family of a deceased West Virginia woman $1.25 million after finding that Boehringer Ingelheim failed to warn of risks associated with its blood thinner Pradaxa, causing her to suffer gastrointestinal bleeding.

The federal trial in Huntington, WV, (US District Court Southern District of West Virginia) awarded $250,000 in compensatory damages to the estate of Betty Erelene Knight and her husband Claude R. Knight, and added $1,000,000 more in punitive damages. The jury added the large punitive award after plaintiff counsel showed that Boehringer Ingelheim engaged in wanton and willful acts in handling of its blockbuster drug Pradaxa, primarily in failing to warn of the risks.

The October 17th plaintiffs’ verdict was the first trial win in the country against Boehringer Ingelheim the German drugmaker, showing that the blockbuster drug is dangerous. The Pradaxa defense team had won three earlier trials for the company, and this verdict on behalf of  the estate of Erelene Knight and her surviving spouse Claude, shows that juries can be convinced of the dangers including fatal risks related to Pradaxa. Mrs. Knight, who was in her 80’s passed away while taking Pradaxa.

She suffered from an irregular heartbeat, a condition that often leads to the development of blood clots, which can travel into the brain and cause a stroke. The plaintiff’s doctor stated that she was at “high risk of stroke.”

Prior to being prescribed Pradaxa, her doctors initially prescribed Coumadin, another prescription blood thinner. Because of the risk of uncontrolled bleeding with this particular drug, the victim required “frequent monitoring” which is what the Pradaxa marketing teams focused on, when meeting with doctors while marketing Pradaxa as a “safer alternative to Coumadin.”  Eventually, the victim grew weary of the inconvenience of such monitoring and learned about Pradaxa, which performs a similar function to Coumadin, from a television commercial.

Her doctor agreed to switch her to Pradaxa, and after about 18 months on the drug, she started to suffer from severe, uncontrolled internal bleeding. At one point she required surgery, which significantly weakened her and set into motion a decline in her health. Within several months of the surgery Erelene Knight passed away. Defense vigorously attempted to point the finger at other health conditions and place blame on anything besides Pradaxa, which failed as the punitive damage award of $1 million showed that the jury clearly saw that Boehringer Ingelheim knew the risks of Pradaxa, yet continued offering the drug without sufficient warnings.

The winning plaintiff trial team consisted of the Childers, Schlueter & Smith Firm and partner  Andy Childers, Neal Moskow of Ury & Moskow, LLC and Yvette Ferrer of Ferrer Poirot & Wansbrough. Congratulations to everyone, as the mass tort world looks forward to additional plaintiff verdicts in the many other Pradaxa cases pending in dockets around the country.

WHAT IS PRADAXA?

·        Pradaxa is an anticoagulant medication used to reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common type of heart rhythm abnormality.

·        The safety and efficacy of Pradaxa were studied in a clinical trial comparing Pradaxa with the anticoagulant warfarin. In the trial, patients taking Pradaxa had fewer strokes than those who took warfarin.1

·        From approval in October 2010 through August 2012, a total of approximately 3.7 million Pradaxa prescriptions were dispensed, and approximately 725,000 patients received a dispensed prescription for Pradaxa from U.S. outpatient retail pharmacies.2

Rulings Prior to Trial

The estate’s lawsuit against Boehringer Ingelheim, focused on Pradaxa’s label, asserting claims that the company knew that “certain blood plasma concentrations of Pradaxa increased the risk of a major bleed without contributing any additional stroke prevention benefit.” This risk was actually disclosed on labels for Pradaxa in Europe, but not the United States at the time of the victim’s care. Boehringer also knew that patients should not take Pradaxa if they also use P-gp inhibitor drugs, which Erelene Knight did. And while the company later altered its label to include this information, it did not directly inform doctors of the risk.

Based on all this, the judge presiding over the case ruled the estate presented sufficient evidence to submit the question of liability for “failure to warn” to the jury. Defense protested that at the relevant time, Pradaxa contained a general warning that the drug “can cause serious and, sometimes, fatal bleeding.” But whether or not this was an “adequate” warning given what BI allegedly knew, but failed to disclose on the original U.S. label, will be for the jury to decide.

How the favorable verdict predicts future trial outcomes in not only Pradaxa cases currently pending around the country, but in the more than 25,000 Xarelto blood thinner cases that are filed in the Xarelto MDL 2592 litigation, see Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase XARELTO-(rivaroxaban)-MDL-2592-USDC-ED-Louisiana (Judge Eldon Fallon), and in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, see XARELTO-Case-No-2349-in-Philadephia-Court-of-Common-Pleas–Complex-Litigation-(PA-State-Court). There are several bellwether trials set for the Philadelphia Xarelto cases in 2019, where Laura Feldman and Rosemary Pinto of the Philadelphi firm of Feldman & Pinto, will be co-lead counsel for the trial team.

Michael Brady Lunch will speak on the Pradaxa litigation as well as the status of Xarelto and related issues at the upcoming Mass Tort Nexus “CLE Immersion Course”

November 9 -12, 2018 at The Riverside Hotel in Fort Lauderdale , FL.

For class attendance information please contact Jenny Levine at 954.520.4494 or Jenny@masstortnexus.com.

For the most up to date information on all MDL dockets and related mass torts visit  www.masstortnexus.com and review our mass tort briefcases and professional site MDL briefcases.

To obtain our free newsletters that contain real time mass tort updates, visit www.masstortnexus.com/news and sign up for free access.

WWW.MASSTORTNEXUS.COM

 

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ZOSTAVAX VACCINE: Unpacking the Data from Merck & Co. Clinical Trials

ZOSTAVAX VACCINE:

Unpacking the Data from Merck & Co. Clinical Trials

October 11, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following information and conclusions are based on opinions formed after a review of relevant facts and data by John Ray, Senior Consultant, Mass Tort Nexus

Background

Herpes zoster (shingles) is a symptom of the varicella-zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. Individuals experiencing active herpes zoster infections often report debilitating pain and blistering skin rashes typically located on the face and torso. The varicella-zoster virus (chickenpox) can remain dormant in the body indefinitely and may emerge decades later as herpes zoster (shingles). Not all persons who have the varicella-zoster virus will develop herpes zoster, and it is impossible to predict who will and who won’t.

American pharmaceutical giant, Merck & Co. (Merck), released its Zostavax vaccine to the market in 2006. In its marketing campaign, Merck claims that “you have a 1 in 3 chance of contracting shingles,” and that the Zostavax vaccine reduces the occurrence of zoster by “51% overall in subjects aged 60 years or older.” The FDA approved the Zostavax vaccine prior to its market release.

Summary of Findings

  1. At a minimum, valid clinical trial results are based on two conditions: (1) trial participants must be diagnostically homogeneous (i.e., they share the same medical diagnosis); and, (2) the number of trial participants must be statistically significant (i.e., results may be reliably extrapolated to a larger group).
  2. Results from the Zostavax clinical trials conducted by Merck are arguably invalid because the trial participants were neither diagnostically homogeneous or comprised a statistically significant number.
  3. Because the risk of developing herpes zoster is higher for those that received the Zostavax vaccine than those who didn’t, Merck’s public marketing campaign of the Zostavax vaccine misled consumers, at best, and caused significant harm, at worst.

 Methodology Flaws in the Zostavax Clinical Trials

Diagnostically Homogeneous Trial Participants

Generally, clinical trials are intended to observe occurrences and outcomes from product administration with trial participants that share a medical diagnosis (i.e., diagnostically homogenous). For example, a clinical trial involving a drug to treat type 2 diabetes would only enroll individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Once a diagnostically homogenous group is identified and recruited for a clinical trial, an equal proportion of the group will be administered the drug being studied while the remainder will be administered either a placebo or another drug intended to treat the same disease or condition in trials testing one drug against another.

Zostavax vaccine clinical trials conducted by Merck differed significantly from normal clinical trial methodology in that Zostavax is not intended to treat an existing diagnosed disease or condition but rather is intended to prevent herpes zoster, a symptom of the varicella-zoster virus. If trial participants did not share a diagnosis of an existing disease or condition and could not reliably predict the future onset of a herpes zoster condition, trial participants were not—and could not be—diagnostically homogeneous. Therefore, conclusions reached by Merck from the Zostavax clinical trials are arguably invalid.

Statistically Significant Number of Trial Participants

After clinical trial observations are recorded, the results are extrapolated to represent predictable outcomes in a larger population. Extrapolations from statistically significant numbers are never as reliable as data collected from a larger, real-world population. Significant real-world data (e.g., data collected from Medicare, countries with national health care systems and/or unbiased third-party authorities) existed prior to the Zostavax trials regarding occurrence rates of herpes zoster by age group.

Numerous authorities and governments had already established that the probability of contracting herpes zoster during a lifetime was between 30 and 33%. Given the fact that a “risk without vaccination rate” was generated using far more reliable methods, there was no reason for Merck to include a placebo group in their trials when real-world data existed relevant to the unvaccinated.

In addition, Merck disqualified participants with compromised immune function from the Zostavax clinical trials. Immuno-compromised individuals are significantly more likely to develop herpes zoster. The 30 – 33% lifetime occurrence rate established by trusted sources from real-world data included persons with compromised immune function. As a result, the real-world data must be considered more accurate than the Zostavax trial data relevant to the placebo group.

The following chart shows the broad results of the first Zostavax trial conducted by Merck. Merck claims that for subjects 60 years of age or older there is a 51% reduction of risk. These results are misleading because they average occurrence rates of persons 80 years of age and older (who are significantly more likely to develop herpes zoster based on real-world data) with occurrence rates from age groups that are significantly less likely to develop herpes zoster. These statistics were used by Merck to obtain licensure for Zostavax from the FDA.

[Merck’s Zostavax link: https://www.merckvaccines.com/Products/Zostavax/efficacy/]

Methodology Flaws in the Zostavax Clinical Trials

Diagnostically Homogeneous Trial Participants

Generally, clinical trials are intended to observe occurrences and outcomes from product administration with trial participants that share a medical diagnosis (i.e., diagnostically homogenous). For example, a clinical trial involving a drug to treat type 2 diabetes would only enroll individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Once a diagnostically homogenous group is identified and recruited for a clinical trial, an equal proportion of the group will be administered the drug being studied while the remainder will be administered either a placebo or another drug intended to treat the same disease or condition in trials testing one drug against another.

Zostavax vaccine clinical trials conducted by Merck differed significantly from normal clinical trial methodology in that Zostavax is not intended to treat an existing diagnosed disease or condition but rather is intended to prevent herpes zoster, a symptom of the varicella-zoster virus. If trial participants did not share a diagnosis of an existing disease or condition and could not reliably predict the future onset of a herpes zoster condition, trial participants were not—and could not be—diagnostically homogeneous. Therefore, conclusions reached by Merck from the Zostavax clinical trials are arguably invalid.

Statistically Significant Number of Trial Participants

After clinical trial observations are recorded, the results are extrapolated to represent predictable outcomes in a larger population. Extrapolations from statistically significant numbers are never as reliable as data collected from a larger, real-world population. Significant real-world data (e.g., data collected from Medicare, countries with national health care systems and/or unbiased third-party authorities) existed prior to the Zostavax trials regarding occurrence rates of herpes zoster by age group.

Numerous authorities and governments had already established that the probability of contracting herpes zoster during a lifetime was between 30 and 33%. Given the fact that a “risk without vaccination rate” was generated using far more reliable methods, there was no reason for Merck to include a placebo group in their trials when real-world data existed relevant to the unvaccinated.

In addition, Merck disqualified participants with compromised immune function from the Zostavax clinical trials. Immuno-compromised individuals are significantly more likely to develop herpes zoster. The 30 – 33% lifetime occurrence rate established by trusted sources from real-world data included persons with compromised immune function. As a result, the real-world data must be considered more accurate than the Zostavax trial data relevant to the placebo group.

The following chart shows the broad results of the first Zostavax trial conducted by Merck. Merck claims that for subjects 60 years of age or older there is a 51% reduction of risk. These results are misleading because they average occurrence rates of persons 80 years of age and older (who are significantly more likely to develop herpes zoster based on real-world data) with occurrence rates from age groups that are significantly less likely to develop herpes zoster. These statistics were used by Merck to obtain licensure for Zostavax from the FDA.

[Merck’s Zostavax link: https://www.merckvaccines.com/Products/Zostavax/efficacy/]

Merck’s Misleading Marketing Scheme

 

 

 

 

 

Merck used the blanket statement, “You have a 1 in 3 chance of contracting shingles,” in their fear-based advertising campaigns for Zostavax. If we ignore the placebo trial group data in favor of the more reliable real-world data which tells us that 33% of individuals will experience herpes zoster during their lifetime leaving 67% that will not, we can conclude the following:

Age Group 60-69

Merck claimed a Zostavax efficacy rate of 64%. When this rate is compared to the real-world data rate, we can conclude that administration of the Zostavax vaccine increased the risk of experiencing herpes zoster by 3% for this group. Those who do not receive the Zostavax vaccine have a 67% chance of never manifesting herpes zoster symptoms while those that do receive the vaccine have a 64% chance of never contracting Herpes Zoster.

Age Group 70-79

Merck claimed a Zostavax efficacy rate of 41%. When this rate is compared to the real-world data rate, we can conclude that administration of the Zostavax vaccine increased the risk of developing herpes zoster by 26% for this group. Those who do not receive Zostavax have a 67% chance of never manifesting herpes zoster symptoms while those that receive the vaccine have a 41% chance of never contracting Herpes Zoster.

 Age Group > 80

Merck claimed a Zostavax efficacy rate of 18%. When this rate is compared to the real-world data rate, we can conclude that administration of Zostavax increased the risk of developing herpes zoster by 49% for this group. Those who do not receive Zostavax have a 67% chance of never manifesting herpes zoster symptoms while those that receive the vaccine have an 18% chance of never contracting Herpes Zoster.

The blended rate (all age groups in the study combined) of 51% efficacy claimed by Merck compared with occurrence rates from real-world data, leads us to conclude that for all intended users, the risk of developing herpes zoster after vaccination with Zostavax is greater than prior to vaccination. Real-world data demonstrates that the relative risk of contracting herpes zoster post-vaccination is 49% while those who are not vaccinated face a 33% risk.

The following graph shows herpes zoster occurrence rates by age group. A comparison of Zostavax trial data to real-world occurrence rates supports another conclusion—the age groups most at risk for developing herpes zoster (and most in need of an effective vaccine) had the least probability of protection from administration of the Zostavax vaccine and were arguably at the highest risk for developing Zostavax as a result of receiving the vaccine.

The foregoing is an observation of statistics and data related to Zostavax. The method by which Merck used and manipulated this data in misleading marketing and advertising is covered in other sections of the material.

The conclusions contained herein are based on opinions formed by the author after a review of the relevant data. We acknowledge that others could draw differing conclusions and opinions based on the same observations.

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WHY THE ZOSTAVAX MDL 2848 IS NOT SUBJECT TO THE “VACCINE COURT” and the “VACCINE ACT”

There would be no MDL 2848 if this was a Vaccine Court case…

By Mark A. York (October 11, 2018)

See: Vaccine Rules – Court of Federal Claims

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP or NVICP) was established by the 1986 National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA), passed by the United States Congress in response to a threat to the vaccine supply due to a 1980s scare over the DPT vaccine. Despite the belief of most public health officials that claims of side effects were unfounded, large jury awards had been given to some plaintiffs, most DPT vaccine makers had ceased production, and officials feared the loss of herd immunity.[1]

The official standing of the “Vaccine Court” was confirmed February 22, 2011 by the US Supreme Court in Bruesewitz v. Wyeth, LLC et al, in https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/10pdf/09-152.pdf

The Office of Special Masters of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, popularly known as “vaccine court“, administers a no-fault system for litigating vaccine injury claims. These claims against vaccine manufacturers cannot normally be filed in state or federal civil courts, but instead must be heard in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, sitting without a jury.

“In the vaccine court, the burden is on a plaintiff to show a biological theory of harm, demonstrate a logical sequence of events connecting the vaccine to the injury, and establish an appropriate time frame in which injury occurred. The petitioner must also show that there is not another biologically plausible explanation for the injury.[13]

A 2005 United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit ruling[14] held that an award should be granted if a petitioner either establishes a “Table Injury” or proves “causation in fact” by proving the following three prongs:

  1. a medical theory causally connecting the vaccination and the injury;
  2. a logical sequence of cause and effect showing that the vaccination was the reason for the injury; and
  3. showing of a proximate temporal relationship between vaccination and injury.

Pursuant to §11(c)(1)(A) of the Vaccine Act, the Vaccine Court has jurisdiction to only hear cases listed on the Vaccine Injury Table see 42 CFR 100.3 Vaccine Injury Table (Drug List).

  1. The ZOSTAVAX vaccine is not a vaccine listed in the Vaccine Injury Table
  2. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986 (“Vaccine Act”), 42 U.S.C. §§ 300aa-1 et seq. does not preempt a Plaintiff from filing a civil complaint in federal court.

 No Special Tax Was Paid By Zostavax

Merck & Co. did not pay the 75 cent tax per dose to the vaccine court, to have Zostavax included on the “Vaccine Injury Table” see 42 CFR 100.3 Vaccine Injury Table, that lists which drugs are under the “Vaccine Court” jurisdiction and not the normal courts of civil procedure in the United states.

Merck & Co. have taken the position that there is no overriding public interest in Zostavax being available, as there is with vaccines for contagious viruses that could potentially cause a public health epidemic.

The 75 cent excise tax on each vaccine administered to children and others, routinely gets routed to the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund, which is collected by the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

CDC Shingles Vaccine Warning of Feb. 12, 2018

Women should avoid getting pregnant for at least 1 month after getting a shingles vaccine. Have a weakened immune system due to disease (such as cancer or AIDS) or medical treatments (such as radiation, immunotherapy, high-dose steroids, or chemotherapy).Feb 12, 2018

For additional CDC information on vaccines see: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/index.html

Why is Varicella Vaccine on the Vaccine Court List?

Some confusion may exist due to the fact that Varicella vaccines are listed on the Vaccine Court list, this reference however does not refer to Zostavax. The Varicella Vaccines subject to vaccine court are related to the Chickenpox vaccines and not the Shingles vaccine.

Only vaccines that have been determined to be in the public interest despite being unavoidably unsafe are on the vaccine court list. No Vaccine Act preemption arguments arise from the Vaccine Act. for Zostavax.  Zostavax was not permitted to be unsafe as drugs listed on the Vaccine Injury Table are classified.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services set up the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) in 1988 to compensate individuals and families of individuals injured by covered childhood vaccines.[4] The VICP was adopted in response to concerns over the pertussis portion of the DPT vaccine.[1] The VICP uses a no-fault system for resolving vaccine injury claims. Compensation covers medical and legal expenses, loss of future earning capacity, and up to $250,000 for pain and suffering; a death benefit of up to $250,000 is available. If certain minimal requirements are met, legal expenses are compensated even for unsuccessful claims.[5]

Since 1988, the program has been funded by an excise tax of 75 cents on every purchased dose of covered vaccine. To win an award, a claimant must have experienced an injury that is named as a vaccine injury in a table included in the law within the required time period or show a causal connection. The burden of proof is the civil law preponderance-of-the-evidence standard, in other words a showing that causation was more likely than not. Denied claims can be pursued in civil courts, though this is rare.[1]

John Ray and other speakers will cover the Zostavax MDL 2848 case criteria and related issues at the upcoming Mass Tort Nexus “CLE Immersion Course”
November 9 -12, 2018 at The Riverside Hotel in Fort Lauderdale , FL.
For class attendance information please contact Jenny Levine at 954.520.4494 or Jenny@masstortnexus.com.
For the most up to date information on all MDL dockets and related mass torts visitwww.masstortnexus.com and review our mass tort briefcases and professional site MDL briefcases.
To obtain our free newsletters that contain real time mass tort updates, visitwww.masstortnexus.com/news and sign up for free access.

 

“VACCINE COURT” Related References

  1. Sugarman SD (2007). “Cases in vaccine court—legal battles over vaccines and autism”. N Engl J Med. 357 (13): 1275–7. doi:1056/NEJMp078168PMID 17898095.
  2. Doja A, Roberts W (2006). “Immunizations and autism: a review of the literature”. Can J Neurol Sci. 33 (4): 341–6. doi:1017/s031716710000528xPMID 17168158.
  3.  Maugh TH II, Zajac A (2010-03-13). “‘Vaccines court’ rejects mercury–autism link in 3 test cases”. Los Angeles Times.
  4. Edlich RF; Olson DM; Olson BM; et al. (2007). “Update on the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program”. J Emerg Med. 33(2): 199–211. doi:1016/j.jemermed.2007.01.001PMID 17692778.
  5. “Filing a claim with the VICP”. Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved 2013-08-19.
  6.  “Vaccine Injury Table”. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2007. Retrieved 2008-01-22.
  7. “National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program statistics reports”. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2008-01-08. Retrieved 2008-01-22.
  8. Balbier TE Jr (1999-09-28). “Statement on National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program”. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved 2008-01-22.
  9.  “Who Can File”. www.hrsa.gov. Last Reviewed: February 2016: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  10. Holder v. Abbott Laboratories, 444 F.3d 383
  11. Davis WN (2006). “No longer immune”. ABA Journal. 92 (7): 19, 43.
  12. Pear R (2002-12-14). “Threats and responses: legal risks; for victims of vaccine, winning case will be hard”. New York Times. Retrieved 2008-01-22.
  13. Keelan, J; Wilson, K (November 2011). “Balancing vaccine science and national policy objectives: lessons from the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program Omnibus Autism Proceedings”. American Journal of Public Health. 101 (11): 2016–21. doi:2105/ajph.2011.300198PMC 3222385PMID 21940934.
  14. Althen v. Secretary of Health and Human Services (Fed. Cir. July 29, 2005). Text This decision, which is binding upon the United States Court of Federal Claims, clarified the standing for proving “causation in fact” absent a “Table Injury” under 42 U.S.C. 300aa-11(c)(1)(C)
  15. Offit PA (2008). “Vaccines and autism revisited—the Hannah Poling case”. N Engl J Med. 358 (20): 2089–91. doi:1056/NEJMp0802904PMID 18480200.
  16. Rovner J (2008-03-07). “Case stokes debate about autism, vaccines”. NPR. Retrieved 2008-03-07.
  17.  Holtzman D (2008). “Autistic spectrum disorders and mitochondrial encephalopathies”. Acta Paediatr. 97 (7): 859–60. doi:1111/j.1651-2227.2008.00883.xPMID 18532934.
  18.  Honey K (2008). “Attention focuses on autism”. J Clin Invest. 118 (5): 1586–7. doi:1172/JCI35821PMC 2336894PMID 18451989.
  19. Kirkland, A. (13 March 2012). “Credibility battles in the autism litigation”. Social Studies of Science. 42 (2): 237–261. doi:1177/0306312711435832PMID 22848999.
  20. Omnibus Autism Proceeding, US Court of Federal Claims, http://www.uscfc.uscourts.gov/omnibus-autism-proceeding, visited October 12, 2016.
  21. Bridges A (2007-06-12). “Children with autism get day in court”. USA Today. Retrieved 2007-10-14.
  22. Freking K, Neergaard L (2009-02-12). “Court says vaccine not to blame for autism”. Associated Press. Retrieved 2009-02-12.

 

 

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BARD HERNIA MESH MDL 2846: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GET INVOLVED

IS YOUR FIRM LOOKING AT THE BARD HERNIA MESH LITIGATION?

By Mark A. York (October 9, 2018)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) One of the fastest growing emerging mass torts is the C.R. Bard/ Davol, Polypropylene Hernia Mesh Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 2846, (Judge Edmund A. Sargus, US District Court, Southern District of Ohio). Bard/Davol controls close to 70 percent of the hernia mesh implant market in the United States and have for close to 10 years, and by simply doing the math you can calculate the number of cases that will be filed into the MDL.

With more than 300,000 surgical mesh implant procedures per year, and a conservative failure rate of 20% and Bard’s 70% market share, the numbers for just the last 5 years would exceed 200,000 potential cases. Using the same figures reflects over 42,000 potentially new failures per year, and accordingly the number of potential cases.

For real time case docket information see the Mass Tort Nexus briefcase: BARD-DAVOL-Hernia-Mesh-MDL-2846-(Polypropylene-Mesh)-USDC-Southern-District-of-Ohio

The U.S. National Library of Medicine reports that incisional hernia repair involving mesh has a recurrence rate of 20-45%. Overall, patients with complex ventral hernias (a bulge in the abdominal wall which can include incisional hernias) have a recurrence rate of approximately 30-40% nationally.

Additional synthetic mesh failure data: “Hernia Reoperation Rate Underestimates Real Recurrence Numbers”. American College of Surgeons, Oct. 24, 2017

http://www.mdedge.com/acssurgerynews/article/55911/general-surgery/hernia-reoperation-rate-underestimates-real-recurrence

Discussions on the Bard Hernia Mesh MDL 2846 took place with Kelsey L. Stokes of Fleming, Nolen & Jez, L.L.P., Houston, Texas, co-lead counsel, who commented “We represent hundreds of clients that have been seriously injured by hernia mesh products manufactured by Davol/C.R. Bard.  We have observed that these devastating injuries are occurring all across the United States.

For additional case related information or potential case referrals, please contact Kelsey Stokes at Kelsey_Stokes@fleming-law.com.

MESH WARNINGS OFFERED LONG AGO

The history of synthetic mesh failures and formal warnings being raised can be traced back more than 20 years, after news broke that mesh firms were warned 21 years ago about the risks of the device’s material. Court filings and other sources reveal that manufacturers were warned decades ago that plastic should not be used to make implants.

CR Bard and its subsidiary Davol were allegedly warned that they should discontinue their use of polypropylene resin back in 1997.

Marlex, the Bard supplier of the synthetics resins,  said repeatedly that they were afraid of being sued if the product was used in implants. In 2004, formal warning notices were sent stating that Marlex was “not for human implantation” and told medical mesh companies that they did not want their custom mesh products used “at any price.”

In an email, CR Bard vice president Roger Darois said “We purchase our polypropylene monofilament from an extrusion supplier who purchases the resin directly from the resin manufacturers,” he said. “Thus, it is likely that they do not know of our implant application. Please do NOT mention Davol’s name in any discussions with these manufacturers. In fact, I would advise purchasing the resign through a third party, not the resin supplier, to avoid a supply issue once the medical application is discovered”

 Different Types Of Mesh Placement

  • Overlay– The hernia mesh is placed between the skin/subcutaneous tissue and the rectus abdominis. Mesh is easiest to remove when it is placed in the overlay position.
  • Inlay– The hernia mesh is placed between layers of the rectus abdominis.
  • Underlay– The hernia mesh is placed between the rectus abdominis and the peritoneum. The hernia mesh has a higher chance of attaching to the patients underlying organs when placed in the underlay position.

THE BARD MDL 2846 POLYPROPYLENE HERNIA MESH PRODUCTS

  • Composix
  • Composix E/X
  • Composix L/P
  • Ventralight
  • Spermatex
  • Sepramesh
  • Ventralex
  • Ventralex ST
  • Kugel Patch
  • Composix Kugel
  • Ventrio
  • Visilex
  • Ventrio ST
  • Marlex (AKA Flat Mesh; Bard Mesh)
  • Perfix Plug
  • Perfix Light Plug
  • 3D Max-Lite
  • 3D Max

 

FDA Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Information and Links

FDA describes hernias, the different treatment options to repair hernias and recommendations for patients that are considering surgery for their hernias. The FDA wants to help patients make informed decisions about their health care and to facilitate a discussion between patients and their surgeons

Official FDA Links: Hernia Surgical Mesh

htts://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/HerniaSurgicalMesh/ucm317438.htmsurgeons.

 https://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/HerniaSurgicalMesh/ucm317440.htm

 https://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/HerniaSurgicalMesh/ucm317438.htm

 Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants- Reporting of Adverse Events to the FDA

(Review these sources and checklists for case evaluation and product identification)

Prompt reporting of adverse events can help the FDA identify and better understand the risks associated with medical devices. If you suspect a problem with surgical mesh, we encourage you to file a voluntary report through MedWatch, the FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting program. Health care personnel employed by facilities that are subject to the FDA’s user facility reporting requirements should follow the reporting procedures established by their facilities. Device manufacturers must comply with the Medical Device Reporting (MDR) regulations.

FDA Related Hernia Mesh Information:

Hernia mesh specifics:

  • Manufacturer’s name
  • Product name (brand name)
  • Catalog number
  • Lot number
  • Size
  • Date of implant
  • Date of explant (if mesh was removed)

Hernia repair involving surgical mesh operation specifics:

  • Preoperative diagnosis, postoperative diagnosis and operative procedure
  • Hernia description including size, location, and status (e.g. reducible, sliding, nonreducible, strangulated)
  • Mesh placement (e.g. onlay, underlay, bridging, extent of fascial overlap, fixation method)

Adverse event specifics:

  • Description of the problem including time of onset, inciting factors and severity,
  • Time to resolution
  • Detailed description of the medical and/or surgical interventions (if required) undertaken in response to the adverse event

What is a Hernia?

A hernia occurs when an organ, intestine or fatty tissue squeezes through a hole or a weak spot in the surrounding muscle or connective tissue. Hernias often occur at the abdominal wall.  Sometimes a hernia can be visible as an external bulge particularly when straining or bearing down.

Types of Hernias

The most common types of hernias are:

  • Inguinal:occurs in the inner groin
  • Femoral:occurs in the upper thigh/outer groin
  • Incisional:occurs through an incision or scar in the abdomen
  • Ventral:occurs in the general abdominal/ventral wall
  • Umbilical:occurs at the belly button
  • Hiatal:occurs inside the abdomen, along the upper stomach/diaphragm

Causes of Hernias

Most hernias are caused by a combination of pressure and an opening or weakness of muscle or connective tissue. The pressure pushes an organ or tissue through the opening or weak spot. Sometimes the muscle weakness is present at birth but more often it occurs later in life. Anything that causes an increase in abdominal pressure can cause a hernia, including obesity, lifting heavy objects, diarrhea or constipation, or persistent coughing or sneezing. Poor nutrition, smoking, and overexertion can weaken muscles and contribute to the likelihood of a hernia.

Treatment Options for Hernias

Hernia repairs are common—more than one million hernia repairs are performed each year in the U.S. Approximately 800,000 are to repair inguinal hernias and the rest are for other types of hernias.1

  • Non-Surgical
    • Watchful Waiting– Your surgeon will watch the hernia and make sure that it is not getting larger or causing problems. Although surgery is the only treatment that can repair hernias, many surgical procedures are elective for adult inguinal hernias. Watchful waiting is an option for people who do not have complications or symptoms with their hernias, and if recommended by their surgeon.
  • Surgical
    • Laparoscopic– The surgeon makes several small incisions in the abdomen that allow surgical tools into the openings to repair the hernia. Laparoscopic surgery can be performed with or without surgical mesh.
    • Open Repair– The surgeon makes an incision near the hernia and the weak muscle area is repaired. Open repair can be done with or without surgical mesh. Open repair that uses sutures without mesh is referred to as primary closure. Primary closure is used to repair inguinal hernias in infants, small hernias, strangulated or infected hernias.

Hernias have a high rate of recurrence, and surgeons often use surgical mesh to strengthen the hernia repair and reduce the rate of recurrence. Since the 1980s, there has been an increase in mesh-based hernia repairs—by 2000, non-mesh repairs represented less than 10% of groin hernia repair techniques.

The use of surgical mesh may also improve patient outcomes through decreased operative time and minimized recovery time. However, recovery time depends on the type of hernia, the surgical approach, and the patient’s condition both before and after surgery.

Information found in medical literature has consistently demonstrated a reduced hernia recurrence rate when surgical mesh is used to repair the hernia compared to hernia repair without surgical mesh. For example, inguinal hernia recurrence is higher with open repair using sutures (primary closure) than with mesh repair2.

Despite reduced rates of recurrence, there are situations where the use of surgical mesh for hernia repair may not be recommended. Patients should talk to their surgeons about their specific circumstances and their best options and alternatives for hernia repair.

 What is Surgical Mesh

Surgical mesh is a medical device that is used to provide additional support to weakened or damaged tissue. The majority of surgical mesh devices currently available for use are constructed from synthetic materials or animal tissue.

Surgical mesh made of synthetic materials can be found in knitted mesh or non-knitted sheet forms. The synthetic materials used can be absorbable, non-absorbable or a combination of absorbable and non-absorbable materials.

Animal-derived mesh are made of animal tissue, such as intestine or skin, that has been processed and disinfected to be suitable for use as an implanted device. These animal-derived mesh are absorbable. The majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine) source.

Non-absorbable mesh will remain in the body indefinitely and is considered a permanent implant. It is used to provide permanent reinforcement to the repaired hernia. Absorbable mesh will degrade and lose strength over time. It is not intended to provide long-term reinforcement to the repair site. As the material degrades, new tissue growth is intended to provide strength to the repair.

Hernia Repair Surgery Complications

Based on FDA’s analysis of medical device adverse event reports and of peer-reviewed, scientific literature, the most common adverse events for all surgical repair of hernias—with or without mesh—are pain, infection, hernia recurrence, scar-like tissue that sticks tissues together (adhesion), blockage of the large or small intestine (obstruction), bleeding, abnormal connection between organs, vessels, or intestines (fistula), fluid build-up at the surgical site (seroma), and a hole in neighboring tissues or organs (perforation).

The most common adverse events following hernia repair with mesh are pain, infection, hernia recurrence, adhesion, and bowel obstruction. Some other potential adverse events that can occur following hernia repair with mesh are mesh migration and mesh shrinkage (contraction).

Many complications related to hernia repair with surgical mesh that have been reported to the FDA have been associated with recalled mesh products that are no longer on the market. Pain, infection, recurrence, adhesion, obstruction, and perforation are the most common complications associated with recalled mesh. In the FDA’s analysis of medical adverse event reports to the FDA, recalled mesh products were the main cause of bowel perforation and obstruction complications.

Please refer to the recall notices here for more information if you have recalled mesh. For more information on the recalled products, please visit the FDA Medical Device Recall website. Please visit the Medical & Radiation Emitting Device Database to search a specific type of surgical mesh.

If you are unsure about the specific mesh manufacturer and brand used in your surgery and have questions about your hernia repair, contact your surgeon or the facility where your surgery was performed to obtain the information from your medical record.

The FDA approved most Bard hernia mesh devices for use in hernia repair surgical procedures through the FDA 510(k) process.  The 510k process does not require a manufacturer to prove that a product is safe for its intended use, but merely requires a showing that a device is a “substantive equivalent” to a product or products already approved by the FDA.  In fact, post-approval, the FDA has advised consumers that adverse events as a result of hernia mesh devices are possible.  The FDA did so as a result of receiving a number of complaints about hernia mesh devices in general.(2)

According to the FDA, “[t]he most common adverse events following hernia repair with mesh are pain, infection, hernia recurrence, adhesion, and bowel obstruction. Some other potential adverse events that can occur following hernia repair with mesh are mesh migration and mesh shrinkage (contraction).” (3)

Hernia Mesh Injuries And Complications

Hernia mesh is used to repair both ventral hernias and inguinal hernias. Various injuries and complications can occur depending on what part of the body the mesh is placed. A coated hernia mesh is also more likely to cause injuries such as infection than a non-coated hernia mesh. The follow is a list of the array of complications we observed:

  • Infection, including sepsis. An infected mesh almost always requires removal.
  • Adhesions form to connect the bowel to the hernia mesh. Adhesions frequently form when ventral hernias are repaired with a coated mesh.
  • Bowel Obstruction caused by adhesion formation. Evidenced by a change in bowel habits or the inability to defecate.
  • Abdominal Pain is a sign of possible adhesion formation, a bowel obstruction, infection, or nerve damage.
  • Rashes are commonly observed in association with hernia meshes such as the C-Qur V-Patch and Ventralex ST.
  • Leg, Groin, and Testicular Pain are all common to inguinal hernias repaired with mesh. This pain can be debilitating.
  • Pain with Sex (Dyspareunia) caused from the mesh used to repair an inguinal hernia attaching to the spermatic cord.
  • Testicle Removal may be necessary if the mesh erodes far enough into the spermatic cord.
  • Diarrhea can be an early symptom of the mesh attaching to the bowel.
  • Constipation can be a sign of a bowel obstruction. You should consult a doctor if your constipation persist for several days.
  • Nausea can be an additional sign of adhesions to the bowel and stomach.
  • Seroma is a fluid capsule surrounding the mesh. Seromas can be present with and without infection.
  • Fistula. An abnormal tunnel between two structures. Our attorneys observe many fistulas connecting to the bowel, which are associated with infections.
  • Dental Problems. Medical reviewers have observed a large number of patients who have lost their teeth after a hernia mesh infection.
  • Autoimmune Disorders. An alarming number of our patients have developed autoimmune disorders after being implanted with a pelvic or hernia mesh.
  • Neurological Changes. Several different patients that have been implanted with the same type of mesh have been diagnosed with unexplained neurological changes on a CT scan.
  • Severe Headache. Typically a sign of a larger problem, such as an infection.
  • Fever. Associated with both an autoimmune response to the mesh and infection.
  • Renal Failure has been observed in those implanted with large coated meshes. The coatings are absorbable and put a great deal of strain on the kidneys.
  • Liver Abnormalities have also been documented in those implanted with coated hernia meshes. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body.
  • Joint Aches and Pain can be caused by increased systemic inflammation due to infection and an autoimmune reaction to the mesh.
  • Abnormal Sweating can be related to an autoimmune response or to an infection.
  • Meshoma is the migration, contracture, or bunching-up of an artificial mesh. Meshomas become hard, tumor-like bodies.

In addition to the Bard MDL 2846, there is other hernia mesh litigation in courts across the country, including the Ethicon Physiomesh MDL 2782, Judge Richard W. Story, US District Court-Northern District of Georgia. For current information on MDL 2782, see the Mass Tort Nexus briefcase Ethicon-MDL-2782-Physiomesh-Hernia-Mesh-Litigation for all up to date docket and case filing information.

There is also the Ethicon Physiomesh New Jersey State Court Multi-county litigation, see Ethicon Physiomesh MCL Designation to Superior Court Atlantic County Notice (New Jersey Supreme Court Aug 15, 2018), for information and to discuss potential referrals in the New Jersey Ethicon Physiomesh litigation contact, Joshua S. Kincannon, at JKincannon@lomurrofirm.com, where Josh is the head of the LoMurro Firm mass tort practice group in Freehold, NJ.

Meet The Hernia Mesh Lead Counsel in November
Kelsey Stokes, lead counsel in the Bard MDL 2846 from the Fleming, Nolen & Jez firm and Joshua Kincannon, lead counsel on the New Jersey Ethicon Physiomesh litigation from the LoMurro Firm will both be speaking at the upcoming Mass Tort Nexus “CLE Immersion Course” November 9 -12, 2018 at The Riverside Hotel in Fort Lauderdale , FL.  
For class attendance information please contact Jenny Levine at 954.520.4494 or Jenny@masstortnexus.com.
For the most up to date information on all MDL dockets and related mass torts visit www.masstortnexus.comand review our mass tort briefcases and professional site MDL briefcases.
To obtain our free newsletters that contain real time mass tort updates, visit www.masstortnexus.com/news and sign up for free access.  

 

 

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Why the New Opioid Infant Addicted-NAS MDL 2872 Was Filed At The Right Time -The Opioid Industry Model of “Profits Before Patients” Is Killing Children

How Will Opiate Big Pharma Address Thousands of Addicted Infants?

By Mark A. York (October 4, 2018)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase MDL-2872 Children-Born-Opioid-Dependent-(Infant NAS) Filed September 20, 2018 for related Infant/NAS case filing information

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA)  Tens of thousands of infants born in the U.S. each year now have NAS, and a recent  Centers for Disease Control report  said the rate of NAS deliveries at hospitals quadrupled during the past 15 years.  The period of hospitalization for NAS infants averages 16 days and hospital costs for a typical newborn with NAS are $159,000-$238,000 greater than those of healthy newborns, according to the attorneys representing the NAS (neonatal abstinence syndrome) babies.

With the filing of a New Motion to Consolidate Opiate Addicted Infant Case as MDL 2872 with the Joint Panel on Multidistrict Litigation, the fire may be lit to move the most vulnerable victims of the opioid crisis into the forefront of the litigation. Will this force Opiate Big Pharma to pay for 20 years of bad conduct in pushing opiate prescriptions on American commerce?  See MDL 2872 Motion to Consolidate Infant-NAS Addicted Opiate Litigation

In West Virginia, home of the highest overdose rates in the nation, the foster care population has increased by 42 percent since 2014.   Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data, from 2013 and released in 2016, suggested West Virginia had the highest rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) of 21 states analyzed.

Later data collected by the state showed the state’s rate was higher than the CDC report indicated, said Christina Mullins, director of the state Department of Health and Human Resources’ Office of Maternal, Child and Family Health.

The 2016 CDC report, which said NAS “occurs primarily among opioid-exposed infants,” showed that as of 2013, West Virginia’s NAS rate was 3.34 percent of all hospital births, a hair higher than Vermont’s 3.33 percent.

After those two states, the rate plummeted significantly, with Kentucky’s 1.5 percent being the next highest – although Maine, which had no data reported in 2013, did have a 3.04 percent rate in 2012, lower than Vermont’s then-No. 1 rate of 3.05 percent and higher than West Virginia’s then-No. 3 rate of 2.17 percent.

Mullins said the data previously came from hospital discharge data, and it’s not easily comparable across all states. She said that when the state began collecting real-time data in October 2016, it got a rate of about 5 percent of all births.

Mullins presented Monday to a legislative interim committee that heard several reports regarding likely impacts of the opioid crisis on kids and education.

The reports indicated that the state was No. 1 or No. 2 in the country in removing children from their homes; the number of youth in state custody increased 46 percent from October 2014 to October of last year; there’s been a 22 percent increase in accepted abuse/neglect referrals over three years; and 85 percent of open child abuse/neglect cases involve drugs.

The number of children in state or foster care hit a record low in Massachusetts earlier this decade. Since then, that number has risen by a quarter, and there are now more children in state care than ever before.

>States, Counties, Cities and others are suing opioid drug makers and distributor in both state and federal courts, see Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase “Opioid Litigation Versus Opiate Prescription Industry MDL 2804, US District Court of Ohio”

 Opioid use by women in rural areas is driving the increasing numbers. Tennessee is part of a cluster of states, including Alabama and Kentucky, experiencing some of the highest rates of NAS births. In East Tennessee the problem is particularly acute: Sullivan County alone reported a rate of 50.5 cases of NAS per 1,000 births, the highest rate in the state for five years running.

In Canada, during the past decade, the number of babies exposed to opioids in the womb has increased 16-fold in Ontario. And according to Ontario’s Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health (PCMCH), more than 950 infants were born to opioid-addicted mothers last year. Just over half of them will live the toughest days of their lives in their first week outside the womb.

Until the governments at the federal, state and local levels can all agree on a long-term viable solution to the opioid crisis and the impact on school age children, infants born addicted and society as a whole, the opiate drug crisis will linger for generations long into the future.

In Ohio, the number of children in state custody has grown by 28 percent since 2015. Foster care populations are up more than 30 percent in Alabama, Alaska, California, Idaho, Indiana, Minnesota and New Hampshire since 2014. States like Illinois, Oklahoma, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Colorado and New Jersey now adopting new approaches to help keep parents and children together, even as parents are receiving treatment for their addictions.

The opioid epidemic plaguing the nation is taking a catastrophic toll on our most vulnerable group, the children of the opiate addicts and those with substance use disorders. Many children are sent to live with grandparents or other family members, often due to a parent overdose or other addiction displays other problems but tragically, a growing number are being placed in the foster-care system, with many states unable to keep up with the demand from both a budget as well as staffing overload.

From 2013 to 2015, the number of children in foster care nationwide jumped almost 7 percent to nearly 429,000, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration on Children and Families, the 2016 to 2018 numbers have moved that number closer to 550,000. Parental substance use was cited as a factor in about 32 percent of all foster placements. From 2000 to 2015, more than half a million people died of an overdose, and currently 91 people a day die from opiate overdoses.

Unfortunately, many children, the indirect victims of the crisis, are not getting the care and services they need. “This is a neglected subpopulation,” says John Kelly, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry in addiction medicine at Harvard Medical School, and the founder and director of the Massachusetts General Hospital. “Because we’re trying to put out the fire in terms of stopping overdose deaths, we haven’t really been attending to other casualties, including kids most importantly.”

To lessen the long-term effects on children, psychologists are treating children in the foster-care system in outpatient, inpatient and residential treatment programs and in school-based mental health programs.

“Treating Women Who Are Pregnant and Parenting for Opioid Use Disorder and the Concurrent Care of Their Infants and Children: Literature Review to Support National Guidance.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28406856

[STUDY OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of opioid use disorder (OUD) during pregnancy is increasing. Practical recommendations will help providers treat pregnant women with OUD and reduce potentially negative health consequences for mother, fetus, and child. This article summarizes the literature review conducted using the RAND/University of California, Los Angeles Appropriateness Method project completed by the US Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to obtain current evidence on treatment approaches for pregnant and parenting women with OUD and their infants and children]

Drug users’ children flooding to foster care

In Washington state, this number is alarming but not widely known, 10,000 high-school seniors said they used heroin or gotten high on opioid-derived painkillers in 2016, those numbers were about the same as two years prior, but foster care placements have surged.

 

Between 2011 and 2017, the state took children from drug-abusing parents nearly 14,000 times. Last year’s rate was the highest for drug-related causes since 2010 — up 16 percent over 2015 — while state hospitals report a steady increase in substance-exposed newborns.

Child-welfare workers hear complaints about increasingly severe problems in school — more physical violence toward peers, or kids who need to be taught separately — from students whose parents are staggering through addiction, said Jenna Kiser, who oversees intake at the state Children’s Administration.

Jenny Heddin, a state agency supervisor stated, “These numbers are very concerning, when children from these homes come into foster care, they can be very difficult to serve.”

This represent one corner of a national wave. More than 37 states report unprecedented numbers of kids entering foster care, many of them for reasons related to a parent’s substance abuse, according to the federal Department of Education.

Damaging children’s futures

By the time Child Protective Services is knocking on someone’s door, the problem is already severe. And so far efforts to respond might best be described as triage — focused more on addiction treatment than prevention, both in Washington and across the country.

As in many other states, political infighting prevents treatment, earlier this year Washington Gov. Jay Inslee proposed spending $20 million on a multipronged effort to combat opioid addiction. The bill never made it to the floor for a full vote, and it contained little funding for prevention. (But $1.7 million targeted for youth did get funding.)

Yet researchers warn that ignoring that aspect of the crisis virtually guarantees costly problems to come as the children of addicts grow into adulthood. Kevin Haggerty, a professor at the University of Washington who studies risk factors for drug abuse, authored one of the few peer-reviewed studies tracking life outcomes for these young people.

In the early 1990s, Professor Haggerty identified 151 elementary and middle-school children in Washington who were growing up with heroin-addicted parents. Fifteen years later, 33 percent had dropped out of high school. The vast majority were addicts themselves, and half had criminal records. Only 2 percent had made it through college. (Nationally, 33 percent of all kindergartners in 1992 grew up to earn a college degree.)

“The results are astounding at how poor the outcomes are, when having a drug-addicted parent,” said Caleb Banta-Green, principal research scientist at the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute at the University of Washington’s School of Public Health.

“We need to be doing a lot more for kids being parented by opiate-addicted parents — and we’re not.”

“Families literally bring their problems to our door now to help them navigate their lives,” Harrington-Bacote said. “Public schools are doing things that fall way outside of regular academic education. But if they don’t, it’s not going to get addressed at all.”

OHIO EXAMPLES – HOW BIG PHARMA OPIOID MONEY DESTROYS LIVES

Way before social workers showed up in his living room this March, Matt McLaughlin, a 16-year-old with diabetes, had taken to a routine not of his doing, trying to scrounge up enough change for food while his mom, Kelly, went out to use heroin. On a good night, the high school junior would walk his neighborhood in Andover, Ohio to pick up frozen pizza from the dollar store, and on bad nights, he’d play video games to keep his mind off his hunger and unknown blood sugar levels.

When Matt was little, his mom Kelly was a Head Start caseworker who taught parents how to manage their autistic children and who hosted potlucks and played Barbie with Matt’s sister, Brianna. “Growing up, we were the house that everyone wanted to come to,” remembered Brianna, now 20. “I loved every minute of it.”

Kelly had neck surgery and got addicted to OxyContin, and by 2015, she was spending her days napping, disappearing for hours at a time, or going to her neighbor’s house, where she would exchange cash for packets of heroin. She started yelling at the kids, food became scarce, life changed for the worse, “It’s like her personality did a 180,” Brianna said. “I felt like I lost my mom to this pit that I couldn’t pull her out of.”

Ashtabula County Children Services answered a tip when someone called the police and urged them to check on the family.

She’d been to detox several times over the years, trying to rid herself of what felt like a demon that had taken over her brain. Last year, she managed to stay clean for 63 days, until a friend came over “and laid out a line—and that was all it took.” There are five heroin dealers within a five-mile radius and all are more than willing to provide an addict the opiate of choice, which is the norm for rural Ohio anymore.

Her kids were once again forced to pack their bags as Kelly would go to detox another time, they were lucky to have relatives nearby. The spiraling opioid epidemic has disrupted so many families that all the foster homes in Ashtabula County are full, with this story being repeated across the country every day.

The scourge of addiction to painkillers, heroin, and fentanyl sweeping the country has produced a flood of bewildered children who, having lost their parents to drug use or overdose, are now living with foster families or relatives. In Ashtabula County, in Ohio’s northeast corner, the number of children in court custody quadrupled from 69 in 2014 to 279 last year. “I can’t remember the last time I removed a kid and it didn’t have to do with drugs,” says a child services supervisor.  Her clients range from preschoolers who know to call 911 when a parent overdoses to steely teenagers who cook and clean while Mom and Dad spend all day in the bathroom. Often, the kids marvel at how quickly everything changed—how a loving mom could transform, as one teenager put it, into a “zombie.”

The pattern mirrors a national trend: Largely because of the opioid epidemic, there were 30,000 more children in foster care in 2015 than there were in 2012—an 8 percent increase. In 14 states, from New Hampshire to North Dakota, the number of foster kids rose by more than a quarter between 2011 and 2015, according to data amassed by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. In Texas, Florida, Oregon, and elsewhere, kids have been forced to sleep in state buildings because there were no foster homes available, says advocacy group Children’s Rights. Federal child welfare money has been dwindling for years, leaving state and local funding to fill in the gaps. But Ashtabula County is one of the poorest counties in Ohio, and despite a recent boost in funding, the state contributes the lowest share toward children’s services of any state in the country. 

More Broken Families, Less Funding

 Ohio also has one of the nation’s highest overdose rates. In 2016, at least 4,149 Ohioans died of drug overdose—a 36 percent jump from the year before, according to the Columbus Dispatch. In 2015, 1 in 9 US heroin deaths occurred in Ohio.

It’s hard to overstate just how pervasive the epidemic feels here. Detective Taylor Cleveland, who investigates drug cases in Ashtabula, told me, “I’m dealing with ruined homes two and three times a day.” Cleveland, who coaches youth soccer and recently adopted a 17-year-old player whose mom overdosed, leads a task force that responds to every overdose in the county. Once, he arrived at an overdose scene only to realize that the victim slouched over in the motel room was his cousin, whose young daughter had called 911. “Every OD that happens, I get a text. I’ve gotten two texts while we’ve been talking.” We’d been talking for less than an hour.

Given the scale of the crisis, it’s not hard to understand why, when Donald Trump promised Ohioans on the campaign trail to “spend the money” to confront the opioid crisis and build a wall so drugs would stop flowing in, locals in this historically blue county took notice. In late October, Trump became the first presidential candidate since John F. Kennedy to visit Ashtabula County. He promised to bring back jobs, to open the long-shuttered steel plants, to build the wall. Twelve days later, Ashtabula residents voted for a Republican president for the first time since Ronald Reagan in 1984.

WHITE HOUSE PROMISED ON OPIOIDS BUT DIDN’T DELIVER

But since he took office, Trump’s plans to tackle the epidemic head-on have fizzled. Republicans’ recent effort to repeal and replace Obamacare would slash funding for Medicaid, which is the country’s largest payer for addiction services—and which covers nearly half of Ohio’s prescriptions for the opioid addiction medication buprenorphine. The bill would enable insurers in some states to get out of the Obamacare requirement to cover substance abuse treatment. A memo leaked in May revealed Trump’s plans to effectively eliminate the White House’s drug policy office, cutting its budget by 95 percent. (The administration has since backpedaled on the plans, following bipartisan criticism.) Trump’s 2018 budget proposes substantial cuts to the Administration for Children and Families, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

“I think some people felt as though nothing else is working,” said one Ashtabula resident when I asked why so many in a Medicaid-dependent area would vote for Trump. Now, she says, “I’m really, really scared. You don’t get it until you live in a small town and you see people die every day.”

Like so many other Midwest Rust Belt counties, Ashtabula, Ohio has seen better days. Locals proudly tell me that the Port of Ashtabula used to be one of the biggest in the world, where barges unloaded iron mined from Minnesota’s Mesabi Range onto trains headed for the steel mills of the Ohio River Valley. Today, once-bustling streets have given way to vacant storefronts and fast-food chains; the surrounding countryside is made up of farm fields, trailer parks, and junkyards. One in three kids now live below the federal poverty line, less than half of adults have a high school education. The financial downturn accelerated in the ’90s when manufacturing jobs started disappearing.

Then Opiate Big Pharma and their marketing campaigns introduced newer “less addictive” painkillers like OxyContin and others like Vicodin were liberally prescribed in communities wrestling with dwindling economic opportunity and rife with workplace injuries common to mines, lumberyards, and factories. As authorities started to tighten the rules on prescribing drugs like OxyContin, the use of heroin, which is chemically nearly identical to opioid painkillers, crept up. But the tipping point, for Ohio and the country, came over the past couple of years, when illicit fentanyl, an opioid up to 100 times more powerful than morphine, started making its way into the heroin supply. Since then, says Dr. Thomas Gilson, the medical examiner for nearby Cuyahoga County, the deaths have been coming “like a tidal wave.”

About five years ago, Ohio noticed a major uptick in the number of parents using heroin. More recently, elected officials have learned more about the parasitic way that opioids co-opt the brain and the complex pull of addictions attitudes have softened, with most realizing there is no good guy or bad guy, once addiction takes hold. The long-term problems are often multiplied many times over by lack of short-term treatment.

Gov. John Kasich, a notorious budget hawk, made national news when he pushed Medicaid expansion through Ohio’s conservative Legislature. “When you die and get to the meeting with St. Peter,” he told one lawmaker, “he’s probably not going to ask you much about what you did about keeping government small, but he is going to ask you what you did for the poor.” He made news yet again last week, when he signed a 2018 budget that will, for the first time in years, increase the state’s funding for children’s services. Yet the $30 million boost in funding over two years, which will pay foster parents and provide counseling for the kids, won’t make up for the $55 million increase in child placement costs over the past three years. Other than county pilot programs, “No policy or state investment has focused specifically on the children flooding into county agency custody as a result of the opioid epidemic,” concluded a report by the Public Children Services Association of Ohio this spring.

Meanwhile, federal funding for children’s services decreased by 16 percent between 2004 and 2014. That’s due in part to an arcane law stipulating that the largest pot of federal money for children’s services applies only to kids from below a certain income threshold. In many states, that threshold is about half the poverty level—in Ohio, it’s roughly $14,000 per year for a family of four. But the opioid epidemic has afflicted families of all stripes. “A few years ago, I was constantly just in homes that were clearly in poverty,” says Mongenel. Now she’s struck by her new clients’ well-kept houses: “You pull up to it and it’s like, ‘Really?’”

The director of one Ohio county stated “that more caseworkers are quitting than ever before, unable to reconcile the overwhelming caseload with the paltry salary, which starts at $28,500..’”

CPS and affiliated social services agencies across the United States are now becoming much more familiar with the latest addiction research on ACEs and impacts on young children. They know that a child with four or more ACEs is twice as likely as other kids to develop cancer and ten times more likely to inject drugs themselves. When they encounter someone like Lisa, they are torn between mitigating one ACE, exposure to parental substance abuse, and catalyzing another: separating a child from her parents, which is what makes these conversations so heart-wrenching.

For county and state professionalsone of the most difficult things about managing opioid cases is how unpredictable they can be, never knowing how a client’s drug-addicted parent will do after detox. Some thrive and are quickly reunited with their families. Others can’t pull themselves out of the black hole of addiction.

Every 19 minutes, an opioid addicted baby is born in America, while many of us are well aware of the repercussions of addiction in adults, but very little is understood about the impact it has on infants. After months of being fed opioids through the mother, these babies suffer through excruciating pain.

Imagine, then, how it feels for a baby. Infants who have been exposed to opioid painkillers like morphine, codeine, oxycodone, methadone treatment or street drugs such as heroin while in utero are literally cut off from the drugs when they are born. Within their first 72 hours of life, about half of the babies who have been exposed begin having withdrawal symptoms.

The medical term for this is neonatal abstinence syndrome, or NAS, and rates of babies born with it are rising along with the exponential increase of painkiller use and abuse.

A recent analysis by the Centers for Disease Control estimated that nearly six out of every 1,000 infants born in the U.S. are now diagnosed with NAS. However, experts say that rate is likely higher, as not all states regularly collect such data.

In Tennessee which is currently the only state in the country that equates substance abuse while pregnant with aggravated assault, the penalty is punishable by a 15-year prison sentence. Eighteen other states consider it to be child abuse, and three say its grounds for civil commitment. Four states require drug testing of mothers and 18 require that healthcare professionals report when drug abuse is suspected. There are also 19 states that have created funding for targeted drug treatment programs for pregnant women.

Opponents of the punishment philosophy claim that punishing addicted pregnant women will not stop them from abusing drugs – instead it will stop them from seeking prenatal care. Many also claim that these policies would unfairly punish mothers for drug use compared to fathers. Organizations, such as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), have encouraged a treatment over punishment approach for pregnant mothers with drug addictions.

For the most up to date information on all MDL dockets and related mass torts visit www.masstortnexus.com and review our mass tort briefcases and professional site MDL briefcases.

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Why Isn’t Medical Cannabis Used to Treat Opioid and Substance Abuse Disorders More Often? 

Will Medical Marijuana Become A Viable Addiction Treatment Option?

By Mark A. York (September 28, 2018)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) More and more medical treatment professionals, politicians and others have joined in the quickly emerging role of medical marijuana to help in treatment by patients struggling with opioid addiction. Now, two studies are reflecting this emerging treatment to be viable.

Will medical marijuana become a viable option in the long term treatment programs that may be coming out of the Opiate Prescription Litigation MDL 2804 and the many state court opioid based lawsuits filed across the country? See Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: National-Prescription-Litigation-MDL-2804-USDC-ND-Ohio, where the various opioid litigation dockets and court rulings are provided.

Recent studies, published journal JAMA Internal Medicine, compared opioid prescription patterns in states that have enacted medical cannabis laws with those that have not. One of the studies looked at opioid prescriptions covered by Medicare Part D between 2010 and 2015, while the other looked at opioid prescriptions covered by Medicaid between 2011 and 2016.

Additionally, three states have approved Medical Cannabis for alternative treatments related to both pain management and substance abuse disorders, where cannabis has been determined as an appropriate treatment. Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Illinois are at the forefront of using changes to state laws regarding medical cannabis in the most effective clinical settings when possible.

PENNSYLVANIA CANNABIS BASED OPIOID ADDICTION TREATMENT

The Pennsylvania Department of Health approved major changes to the state’s medical marijuana program, when the  health department added opioid addiction to the list of conditions eligible for treatment with medicinal cannabis. With that decision, Pennsylvania joins New Jersey and Illinois as the only states that have done so.

Pennsylvania Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine told local media that marijuana won’t be the first treatment for addiction to opioids. Instead, doctors will try more traditional therapies first.

“It’s important to note that medical marijuana is not a substitute for proven treatments for opioid use disorder,” Dr. Levine said. “In Pennsylvania, medical marijuana will be available to patients if all other treatment fails, or if a physician recommends that it be used in conjunction with traditional therapies.”

A related positive note by Pennsylvania is the Department of Health has approved cannabis research licenses for five Philadelphia area medical schools on Monday. With one topic of research at the institutions being the potential role of cannabis in addiction treatment as a normal treatment protocol.

The schools that received approval to study cannabis are Drexel University College of Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.

JAMA STUDY RESULTS

The researchers found that states that allow the use of cannabis for medical purposes had 2.21 million fewer daily doses of opioids prescribed per year under Medicare Part D, compared with those states without medical cannabis laws. Opioid prescriptions under Medicaid also dropped by 5.88% in states with medical cannabis laws compared with states without such laws, according to the studies.

“This study adds one more brick in the wall in the argument that cannabis clearly has medical applications,” said David Bradford, professor of public administration and policy at the University of Georgia and a lead author of the Medicare study.

“And for pain patients in particular, our work adds to the argument that cannabis can be effective.”

Medicare Part D, the optional prescription drug benefit plan for those enrolled in Medicare, covers more than 42 million Americans, including those 65 or older. Medicaid provides health coverage to more than 73 million low-income individuals in the US, according to the program’s website.

“Medicare and Medicaid publishes this data, and we’re free to use it, and anyone who’s interested can download the data,” Bradford said. “But that means that we don’t know what’s going on with the privately insured and the uninsured population, and for that, I’m afraid the data sets are proprietary and expensive.”

Republicans Support Legalizing Medical Cannabis

Earlier this year, the National Academy of Sciences, in a 395-page report, refuted the official US Department of Justice position that cannabis is a “gateway drug” and that using marijuana can lead to opioid addiction and instead found evidence of cannabis having therapeutic and health benefits. Joe Schrank, a social worker who worked at various detox centers and clean houses, is now practicing the report’s findings at High Sobriety treatment center in Los Angeles, where he offers clients medical and therapeutic sessions, and daily doses of marijuana to treat a variety of addictions.

The Opioid Crisis Is Here

The new research comes as the United States remains entangled in the worst opioid epidemic the world has ever seen. Opioid overdose has risen dramatically over the past 15 years and has been implicated in over 500,000 deaths since 2000 — more than the number of Americans killed in World War II.

“As somebody who treats patients with opioid use disorders, this crisis is very real. These patients die every day, and it’s quite shocking in many ways,” said Dr. Kevin Hill, an addiction psychiatrist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, who was not involved in the new studies.

“We have had overuse of certain prescription opioids over the years, and it’s certainly contributed to the opioid crisis that we’re feeling,” he added. “I don’t think that’s the only reason, but certainly, it was too easy at many points to get prescriptions for opioids.”

Today, more than 90 Americans a day die from opioid overdose, resulting in more than 42,000 deaths per year, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Opioid overdose recently overtook vehicular accidents and shooting deaths as the most common cause of accidental death in the United States, the CDC says.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doctors must lead us out of our opioid abuse epidemic

Like opioids, marijuana has been shown to be effective in treating chronic pain as well as other conditions such as seizures, multiple sclerosis and certain mental disorders, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Research suggests that the cannabinoid and opioid receptor systems rely on common signaling pathways in the brain, including the dopamine reward system that is central to drug tolerance, dependence and addiction.

“All drugs of abuse operate using some shared pathways. For example, cannabinoid receptors and opioid receptors coincidentally happen to be located very close by in many places in the brain,” Hill said. “So it stands to reason that a medication that affects one system might affect the other.”

But unlike opioids, marijuana has little addiction potential, and virtually no deaths from marijuana overdose have been reported in the United States, according to Bradford.

“No one has ever died of cannabis, so it has many safety advantages over opiates,” Bradford said. “And to the extent that we’re trying to manage the opiate crisis, cannabis is a potential tool.”

Comparing states with and without medical marijuana laws

  • Researchers compared prescription patterns in states with and without medical cannabis laws
  • States with medical marijuana had 2.21 million fewer daily doses of opioids prescribed per year
  • Opioid prescriptions under Medicaid dropped by 5.88% in states with medical cannabis laws

In order to evaluate whether medical marijuana could function as an effective and safe alternative to opioids, the two teams of researchers looked at whether opioid prescriptions were lower in states that had active medical cannabis laws and whether those states that enacted these laws during the study period saw reductions in opioid prescriptions.

Both teams, in fact, did find that opioid prescriptions were significantly lower in states that had enacted medical cannabis laws. The team that looked at Medicaid patients also found that the four states that switched from medical use only to recreational use — Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington — saw further reductions in opioid prescriptions, according to Hefei Wen, assistant professor of health management and policy at the University of Kentucky and a lead author on the Medicaid study.

“We saw a 9% or 10% reduction (in opioid prescriptions) in Colorado and Oregon,” Wen said. “And in Alaska and Washington, the magnitude was a little bit smaller but still significant.”

Cannabis legalization by the numbers

The first state in the United States to legalize marijuana for medicinal use was California, in 1996. Since then, 29 states and the District of Columbia have approved some form of legalized cannabis. All of these states include chronic pain — either directly or indirectly — in the list of approved medical conditions for marijuana use, according to Bradford.

The details of the medical cannabis laws were found to have a significant impact on opioid prescription patterns, the researchers found. States that permitted recreational use, for example, saw an additional 6.38% reduction in opioid prescriptions under Medicaid compared with those states that permitted marijuana only for medical use, according to Wen.

The method of procurement also had a significant impact on opioid prescription patterns. States that permitted medical dispensaries — regulated shops that people can visit to purchase cannabis products — had 3.742 million fewer opioid prescriptions filled per year under Medicare Part D, while those that allowed only home cultivation had 1.792 million fewer opioid prescriptions per year.

“We found that there was about a 14.5% reduction in any opiate use when dispensaries were turned on — and that was statistically significant — and about a 7% reduction in any opiate use when home cultivation only was turned on,” Bradford said. “So dispensaries are much more powerful in terms of shifting people away from the use of opiates.”

The impact of these laws also differed based on the class of opioid prescribed. Specifically, states with medical cannabis laws saw 20.7% fewer morphine prescriptions and 17.4% fewer hydrocodone prescriptions compared with states that did not have these laws, according to Bradford.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is fentanyl: A visual guide

Fentanyl prescriptions under Medicare Part D also dropped by 8.5% in states that had enacted medical cannabis laws, though the difference was not statistically significant, Bradford said. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid, like heroin, that can be prescribed legally by physicians. It is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine, and even a small amount can be fatal, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

“I know that many people, including the attorney general, Jeff Sessions, are skeptical of cannabis,” Bradford said. “But, you know, the attorney general needs to be terrified of fentanyl.”

MAKING CANNABIS AVAILABLE

This is not the first time researchers have found a link between marijuana legalization and decreased opioid use. A 2014 study showed that states with medical cannabis laws had 24.8% fewer opioid overdose deaths between 1999 and 2010. A study in 2017 also found that the legalization of recreational marijuana in Colorado in 2012 reversed the state’s upward trend in opioid-related deaths.

“There is a growing body of scientific literature suggesting that legal access to marijuana can reduce the use of opioids as well as opioid-related overdose deaths,” said Melissa Moore, New York deputy state director for the Drug Policy Alliance. “In states with medical marijuana laws, we have already seen decreased admissions for opioid-related treatment and dramatically reduced rates of opioid overdoses.”

Sessions: DOJ looking at ‘rational’ marijuana policy

Some skeptics, though, argue that marijuana legalization could actually worsen the opioid epidemic. Another 2017 study, for example, showed a positive association between illicit cannabis use and opioid use disorders in the United States. But there may be an important difference between illicit cannabis use and legalized cannabis use, according to Hill.

“As we have all of these states implementing these policies, it’s imperative that we do more research,” Hill said. “We need to study the effects of these policies, and we really haven’t done it to the degree that we should.”

The two recent studies looked only at patients enrolled in Medicaid and Medicare Part D, meaning the results may not be generalizable to the entire US population.

But both Hill and Moore agree that as more states debate the merits of legalizing marijuana in the coming months and years, more research will be needed to create consistency between cannabis science and cannabis policy.

“There is a great deal of movement in the Northeast, with New Hampshire and New Jersey being well-positioned to legalize adult use,” Moore said. “I believe there are also ballot measures to legalize marijuana in Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Nebraska and South Dakota as well that voters will decide on in Fall 2018.”

Hill called the new research “a call to action” and added, “we should be studying these policies. But unfortunately, the policies have far outpaced the science at this point.”

There are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved painkillers derived from marijuana, but companies such as Axim Biotechnologies Inc, Nemus Bioscience Inc and Intec Pharma Ltd have drugs in various stages of development.

The companies are targeting the more than 100 million Americans who suffer from chronic pain, and are dependent on opioid painkillers such as Vicodin, or addicted to street opiates including heroin.

Opioid overdoses, which have claimed the lives of celebrities including Prince and Heath Ledger as victims, contributed to more than 33,000 deaths in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Essure Litigation Against Bayer Survives Preemption Challenge – Cases Remanded to Pennsylvania State Court

Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Is Now The Venue for Filing “Essure” Cases

By Rosemary Pinto, Esq. Feldman & Pinto

And Mark A. York, Mass Tort Nexus

(September 27, 2018)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) Bayer Corp. and its entities, the makers of Essure, a permanent contraceptive implant subject to thousands of injury reports and repeated safety restrictions by regulators ,said  recently that it will stop selling the device in the U.S., the only country where it remains available.

On July 23, 2018, U.S. District Senior Judge, John R. Padova of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, ruled  that the federal court did not have jurisdiction over the cases against Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals Inc., and the legal claims over the Essure contraceptive device.

The cases were originally filed in Philadelphia court but were removed by Bayer with the company claiming the removals were proper because the plaintiffs’ claims involved an interpretation of federal law, including Food and Drug Administration regulations.

The company cited a 2017 ruling by a U.S. District Court in North Carolina in another Essure case, Burrell v. Bayer, in which it found that it had federal question jurisdiction because “the labeling of FDA-approved medical devices is governed by the FDA under the MDA, and [the] state law is generally pre-empted under 21 U.S.C. Section 360k.”

But Padova instead followed the lead of courts in the Eastern District of Kentucky and the Eastern District of Missouri, finding that “Congress intended for the state courts to resolve cases such as this one, which ask whether a defendant violated state laws that parallel federal requirements applicable to Essure.”

Bayer argued that the cases were of federal concern because the Essure devices were subject to “stringent federal scrutiny” as Class III medical devices.

“We certainly agree with Bayer that Congress has a significant interest in the regulation of Class III medical devices,” Padova said. Nevertheless, Padova added, the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 “permit individuals to bring state law causes of action alleging violations of duties that parallel the federal requirements. It would be entirely inconsistent with this structure to conclude that Congress intended all such state law causes of action to be brought in federal court.”

Padova also said Bayer failed to identify any disputed federal issue, noting that “the central claims in the complaints are that Bayer violated state law and the complaints merely reference federal law to rebut any argument that their state law claims are preempted.

Feldman Pinto In Philadelphia Provides Insight

Essure Litigation Survives Preemption Challenge, Cases Remanded to State Court

Essure is a birth control device composed of two metal coils implanted in a patient’s fallopian tubes. Women injured by the device have filed more than 16,000 lawsuits against Bayer Healthcare, alleging, among other things, that Bayer failed to provide adequate warnings of severe Essure complications suffered by plaintiffs from device breakage, migration, and / or expulsion. Complications include perforation of fallopian tubes, uteri, rectums, colons, and other organs; severe and chronic pelvic or abdominal pain; and autoimmune diseases.

Essure Claims for Negligent Misrepresentation and Negligent Failure to Warn Survive Preemption Challenge

All of the approximately 16,000 Essure lawsuits in state and federal court exist as individual legal actions rather than class actions or multidistrict litigation. Five such cases were consolidated in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Defendants filed motions in all five cases, requesting dismissal of plaintiffs’ claims on the basis of express or implied preemption, failure to state a plausible claim, or failure to plead fraud with particularity.

In March 2016, the court denied defendants’ motions to dismiss plaintiffs’ claims of negligent misrepresentation and negligent failure to warn, holding that the state law claims set forth plausible claims for relief and were not preempted by federal law.

Consolidated Essure Cases Remanded to State Court

In July 2018, the Eastern District of Pennsylvania remanded 19 Essure injury cases to the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. The district court found that it lacked both diversity of citizenship and federal question subject-matter jurisdiction over the consolidated individual actions and remanded them to state court.

 Essure Statute of Limitations

Defendants in Essure personal injury cases may argue that the statute of limitations period in all Essure cases should begin on November 18, 2016, the date the FDA approved a black box warning (its strongest warning level) for Essure. In reality, the dates triggering Essure limitation periods will vary. The beginning of each plaintiff’s limitation period will depend on the plaintiff’s individual claims and state law applicable to the particular case.

Bayer Stops USA Sales

Bayer announced in June 2018 that it would voluntarily discontinue U.S. sales of Essure by the end of this year “for business reasons” but earlier this month affirmed the safety profile of the device. Last week, Bayer took Netflix to task over the accuracy of its medical device documentary “The Bleeding Edge.” The tide was turning for Bayer at that point, sales were already down 70% after the 2016 FDA warning and the public became aware of the risks of using Essure.

Bayer received FDA approval to sell Essure in 2002 and promoted it as a quick and easy permanent solution to unplanned pregnancies. Essure consists of two thin-as-spaghetti nickel-titanium coils inserted into the fallopian tubes, where they spur the growth of scar tissue that blocks sperm from fertilizing a woman’s eggs.

Because of the reported complaints, the FDA added its most serious warning to the device in 2016 and ordered the company to conduct a 2,000-patient study. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said Friday, the agency would work with Bayer to continue the study, but noted “Bayer will not be able to meet its expected enrollment numbers” for new patients. The study was designed to follow patients for three years to better assess complications.

Gottlieb said the FDA will continue to monitor adverse events reported to its database after Essure is removed from the market.  He stated “I also want to reassure women who’ve been using Essure successfully to prevent pregnancy that they can continue to do so,” and added “Those who think it’s causing problems, such as persistent pain, should consult with their doctors,” with Gottlieb further noting that device removal “has its own risks.”

Essure’s original label warned that the device’s nickel can result in allergic reactions. Its current labeling lists hives, rash, swelling and itching as possible reactions.

But many women have attributed other problems to the implant, including mood disorders, weight gain, hair loss and headaches. Those problems are listed in the current FDA labeling for the device, with the qualifier: “It is unknown if these symptoms are related to Essure or other causes.”

Informational material Bayer supplied to doctors and patients lists potential problems and states the devices are meant to be permanent. It also says removal may require complicated surgery, including a hysterectomy, that might not be covered by insurance.

Non-Profit Weighs In

Diana Zuckerman, president of the nonprofit National Center for Health Research, said Essure is among medical devices approved without “clear evidence of safety or effectiveness. As a result, when thousands of women reported serious complications from Essure, there was no unbiased long-term research to refute or confirm those reports” she also stated, “If patients had been listened to when the first clinical trials were conducted on Essure, better research would have been conducted to determine exactly how safe and effective Essure is.”

 Feldman & Pinto is Representing Plaintiffs in Essure Litigation

The Philadelphia personal injury firm of Feldman & Pinto concentrates its practice in plaintiffs’ drug and medical device injury litigation. Each of the firm’s attorneys has more than 20 years’ experience trying personal injury and wrongful death cases in state and federal court. Feldman & Pinto currently represents plaintiffs in approximately 20 Essure injury cases in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas.  Attorney Rosemary Pinto can be contacted at rpinto@feldmanpinto.com.

To follow mass torts and multi-district litigation sign-up for the  Mass Tort Nexus “Free Newsletters” at www.masstortnexus.com/news

For real time case updates and court records on all mass torts visit the Mass Tort Nexus Professional Site at www.masstortnexus.com

 

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Untitled

BEFORE THE UNITED STATES JUDICIAL PANEL ON MULTIDISTRICT LITIGATION

 

 

IN RE: CHILDREN BORN                       MDL – _________

OPIOID-DEPENDENT

 

BRIEF IN SUPPORT OF PLAINTIFFS’ MOTION FOR TRANSFER OF

ACTIONS PURSUANT TO 28 U.S.C. § 1407 FOR COORDINATED OR

CONSOLIDATED PRETRIAL PROCEEDINGS

Plaintiffs[1] respectfully move that the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (“Panel”), pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1407 and Rule 6.2 of the Rules of Procedure of the Panel, transfer the actions on behalf of children born opioid-dependent listed in the attached Schedule of Actions and subsequent tag-along actions to a separate MDL before the Southern District of West Virginia.; alternatively, Plaintiffs request transfer to the Southern District of Illinois.

I.        Children Born Opioid-Dependent Need A Separate MDL From MDL 2804

Movants seek transfer and coordination or consolidation of all cases filed on behalf of opioiddependent infants into a new MDL for the reasons laid out

[1] Movants are: Deric Rees and Ceonda Rees, individually and as next friend and guardian of Baby T.W.B. on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Illinois Class); Darren and Elena Flanagan, individually and as adoptive parents and next friends of Baby K.L.F., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Tennessee Class); Rachel Wood, individually and as next friend and adopted mother of Baby O.W., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Missouri Class); Melissa Ambrosio, individually and as next friend of Baby G.A., and on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (California Class); Shannon Hunt, individually and as next friend of Baby S.J., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Maryland Class); Bobbi Lou Moore on behalf of Baby R.R.C., and all other similarly situated (West Virginia Class); Walter and Virginia Salmons, individually and as the next friend or guardian of Minor W.D. and on behalf of all others similarly situated (National Class).

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A New Opiate MDL Was Requested For Benefit of Opioid Addicted Babies On September 20, 2018

THE JPML HAS BEEN REQUESTED TO CONSOLIDATE A NEW ADDICTED INFANT MULTIDISTRICT LITIGATION

By Mark A. York (September 21, 2018)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have the most vunerable plaintiffs in the opiate litigation been underserved by firms primarily focused on representing governmental entities in Opiate MDL 2804 and state court consolidations? What about the epidemic of NAS affected babies who have been born addicted to prescription opiates?

Link to Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase Re: OPIOIDS-Children-Born-Opioid-Dependent-(NAS)-JPML-MDL-(PENDING)

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) Lawyers representing addicted infants in the opiate litigation have now filed a Motion for Transfer and Consolidation of Children Born Opioid Dependent with the JPML on September 21, 2018. To read the entire JPML Motion and Brief in Support, see our briefcase Re: masstortnexus.com/News/4335/Motion-for-New-Infant-NAS-Opioid-Dependant-MDL-Filed-With-JPML-September-20-2018.

Plaintiffs lawyers have also filed class actions in nine states on behalf of infants, and other “individuals” affected by opiate use and subsequent addiction, with very limited input into the federal litigation process. On May 21, 2018 a coalition of nine law firms filed court papers asking MDL 2804 Judge Dan Polster (USDC ND Ohio) for permission to request a separate discovery and litigation track for the baby cases, which was summarily denied without comment by the court on June 28, 2018.

Lawyers and public health officials have estimated that there could be more than 1 million babies diagnosed with “neonatal abstinence syndrome,” which occurs when infants are born to mothers who used opioids. There is a request seeking a trust of more than $1 billion to help pay for medical monitoring of the children over the next few decades.

“There has been no large-scale attempt to find out what happens to these children, and there are thousands at this time, perhaps over 1 million, progressing now through the school system and growing up,” said Scott Bickford, a principal at Martzell, Bickford & Centola in New Orleans. “Theoretically, these kids are born addicted and may stay addicts for life.”

Treatment and Prognosis for Opioid Addicted Newborns

The course of treatment will be determined by factors such as:

  • Baby’s gestational age, medical history, and health
  • Severity of the disorder and expectation of the effects it will have
  • Baby’s tolerance of the therapies, procedures, or medications
  • Parents’ preference

Immediate treatment for withdrawal effects focuses on comfort and thriving. Babies suffering from opioid withdrawal often have trouble resting and eating, so treatment involves:

  • Swaddling for comfort
  • Adding extra calories to account for energy used through restlessness and increased activity
  • Intravenous fluids for dehydration
  • Medication to relieve discomfort and eliminate symptoms like seizures

Long-term treatment involves treating physical and behavioral effects and can involve:

  • Monitoring and treating vision and hearing impairments
  • Therapy for behavioral problems
  • Language therapy
  • Treatment for chronic ear infections
  • Interventions for cognitive deficits
  • Treatment for sleep disturbance

Babies are the latest segment of the opioid epidemic to attempt to get a front-row seat in the legal case against manufacturers and distributors. More than 1,000 lawsuits have been coordinated in multidistrict litigation in Cleveland before U.S. District Judge Dan Polster of the Northern District of Ohio, who has allowed a limited amount of discovery to go forward, (see Mass Tort Nexus Briefcase OPIOID-National-Prescription-Litigation-MDL-2804-USDC-Northern-District-of-Ohio) for case docket information.

The vast majority of plaintiffs are cities and counties seeking to recoup the costs of medical treatment and law enforcement, but Native American tribes, hospitals and others have elbowed into the case. New plaintiffs are emerging, such as class actions—including eight filed this week—filed on behalf of individuals alleging the opioid epidemic caused their health insurance premiums to skyrocket.

At least 11 cases have been brought on behalf of babies, many of whom suffer from addiction and learning disabilities. Bickford said the cases are in states that have medical monitoring laws, which include New York and California. According to the case filed in New York Supreme Court for Niagara County, for instance, lifetime medical costs could include treatment of developmental, psychiatric, emotional or behavioral disorders associated with addiction.

THIS IS A MUCH BIGGER PROBLEM

Dr. Shawn Hollinger, neonatologist at Niswonger Children’s Hospital, cradled baby Jayden’s head in an effort to comfort him. After 35 days in the neonatal intensive care unit, Jayden was ready to go home.

The number of children needing intensive treatment for NAS has become so overwhelming that the hospital opened a new ward this year just to care for them. Since 2009, hospital staff have treated over 1,800 babies with NAS. In the past 12 months, Hollinger has seen 351 infants with NAS come through the NICU.

After birth, children exposed to drugs in the womb experience a multitude of symptoms, including tremors and seizures. Even after being released from the hospital, some children may still have to be treated with medication and physical therapy. It can cost upwards of $60,000 to treat one baby.

“The intent would be to construct a trust that would deliver financial assistance directly to the custodians of these children,” he said. Custodians could include other family members, foster parents or birth parents who have kicked the habit, he said.

The defendants in all the baby cases include opioid manufacturers Purdue Pharma, Johnson & Johnson, Endo Health Solutions and Teva Pharmaceuticals, as well as distributors McKesson Corp., AmerisourceBergen Corp. and Cardinal Health Inc. The New York complaint also named Insys Therapeutics Inc.

Johnson & Johnson spokeswoman Wanda Moebius wrote in an email: “Our actions in the marketing and promotion of these medicines were appropriate and responsible. The labels for our prescription opioid pain medicines provide information about their risks and benefits, and the allegations made against our company are baseless and unsubstantiated. In fact, our medications have some of the lowest rates of abuse among this class of medications.”

Endo spokeswoman Heather Zoumas Lubeski said, “We deny the allegations contained in these lawsuits and intend to vigorously defend the company.”

Representatives of the other defendants either did not respond or declined to comment.

It’s not the first time the coalition of law firms tried to get Polster to create a separate “baby track.” On June 28, the judge denied an earlier request.

“We’ve asked the court to reconsider our motion for a separate baby track for babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome,” Bickford said. “We don’t think the present MDL and the people in it who essentially represent state and local governments really have the children’s interests at heart.”

The plaintiffs’ executive committee in charge of the opioid MDL has refused to provide information about discovery and depositions, he said. His request described the discovery process as operating under a “cloak of secrecy” and included an attached email exchange in which executive committee member Jayne Conroy of Simmons Hanly Conroy called his request to monitor depositions “not necessary” and “burdensome.”

Conroy said in a statement: “All our legal efforts are directed at the companies who caused the opioid epidemic.  Any success will benefit all victims.”

Earlier this summer, the Judge charged with control over the federal MDL involving government entities’ claims against opioid manufacturers and distributors rejected a request for the inclusion of NAS baby cases within a special litigation track. The request would create a nationwide medical monitoring trust fund for NAS babies within the existing MDL litigation regarding prescription opioid

On May 31, 2018 counsel for the baby/NAS addicted plaintiffs filed a Motion for Leave to Establish a Separate Track for Opioid Baby Claims, with the court denying the request via text order entry below.

06/28/2018 Order [non-document] denying Motion for leave to File Motion for Order to Establish Separate Track for Opioid Baby Claims filed by Melissa Ambrosio, Darren Flanagan, Elena Flanagan, Ceonda Rees, Deric Rees, Virginia Salmons, Walter Salmons, Roxie Whitley, Rache l Wood(Related Doc # 540 ). Judge Dan Aaron Polster (MDL 2804) on 6/28/18.(P,R) (Entered: 06
Court Response to Previous Attempt to Get a Baby Track in Opiate MDL 2804

 Tens of thousands of infants born in the U.S. each year now have NAS, and a recent Centers for Disease Control report said the rate of NAS deliveries at hospitals quadrupled during the past 15 years.

The period of hospitalization for NAS infants averages 16 days and hospital costs for a typical newborn with NAS are $159,000$238,000 greater than those of healthy newborns, according to the attorneys representing the NAS babies.

Dr. Kanwaljeet J. S. “Sunny” Anand, the nation’s foremost expert on opioids in infants and a Professor of Pediatrics, Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, is a medical expert to the legal team. “There is an unprecedented epidemic of opioid addiction sweeping across the U.S.,” said Dr. Anand. “Newborn babies are the most vulnerable citizens, their lives and developmental potential are disrupted by NAS, but arrangements for their short-term and long-term care have been ignored until now. These babies need strong advocacy and legal action to ensure that their rights are protected, and that they urgently receive essential medical care and rehabilitation. On average, one infant with NAS is hospitalized every hour in the U.S.”

Named as defendants in the class actions are an array of pharmaceutical manufacturers, distributors and retailers, all of whom netted billions of dollars due to unfair and deceptive trade practices that preyed on all Americans, including the unborn, say the attorneys.

“A medical monitoring fund would document and address the medical problems these children will have to face for a lifetime,” said Mr. Bickford. The filing today objects to current settlement negotiations engaged by the opioid MDL which ignore the NAS babies’ interests.

“Legal precedent recognizes the difference between present and future claims in negotiations of this magnitude,” said Mr. Bickford. “Without being at the table, the legal representatives of NAS babies and children will not be heard and the due process rights of these infants and children will be denied.”

The filing says only government, hospital and third-party payors are at the table in negotiating a settlement through the MDL, though no agreement has yet been reached. The attorneys representing the NAS babies have raised concerns that outcomes similar to the Tobacco MDL settlement, where money was diverted to state budget deficits instead of the intended victims, might happen here.

 Born to women addicted to drugs, newborns suffer through withdrawal

Babies suffering through opioid withdrawal have a distinct way of crying: a short, anguished, high-pitched wail, repeated over and over. It echoes through the neonatal therapeutic unit of Cabell Huntington Hospital in Huntington, West Virginia. A week-old girl has been at it, inconsolably, since six o’clock this morning. At 10 o’clock Sara Murray, the unit’s soft-spoken, no-nonsense nurse manager, sighs. “This may be a frustrating day,” she says.

The opioid epidemic in the United States is painfully evident in hospital newborn units across the country. In 2012 nearly 22,000 babies were born drug dependent, one every 25 minutes, according to the most recent federal data. As the opioid crisis has escalated dramatically over the past five years, those numbers have surely climbed.

West Virginia, at two and a half times the national average, has the highest rate of deaths from drug overdose—mostly from opioids. Cabell County, which averaged about 130 overdose calls to 911 annually until 2012, received 1,476 calls last year and is on pace to reach around 2,000 this year. Emergency workers saved many of those people, including an 11-year-old, but inpatient treatment programs have long waiting lists. At Cabell Huntington Hospital, one in five newborns has been exposed to opioids in the womb.

“What you’re seeing here is the tip of the iceberg of substance use,” says neonatologist Sean Loudin, the unit’s medical director.

In 2012 the neonatal intensive care unit became so overwhelmed by drug-dependent babies that it had to turn away newborns with other medical needs. The hospital opened this specialized unit to treat withdrawal. It typically has 18 babies. On this day there are 23.

The babies shake, sweat, vomit, and hold their bodies stiff as planks. They eat and sleep fitfully. Swaddled, they lie in bassinets or in the arms of nurses, parents, or volunteers. The place doesn’t have the hustle or beeping machinery of an ICU. Instead there are dim lights and hushed conversations because the babies need calm and quiet. Many also need methadone or other medication to relieve their symptoms. They are weaned from it over days or weeks.

“OK,” Murray whispers to a bleating 41-day-old boy. She gently lifts him to her chest, cradles him firmly, and places a green pacifier in his mouth. He sucks it fast and hard, like a piston.

Opioids pass readily from a pregnant woman’s bloodstream through the placenta and across the fetal blood-brain barrier. When birth abruptly shuts down the flow of the drug, the baby’s nervous system can trigger the agitating symptoms of withdrawal. Studies show that 55 percent to 94 percent of newborns exposed to opioids develop symptoms. Prenatal exposure to other widely used drugs, including benzodiazepines and certain antidepressants, also can lead to withdrawal shortly after birth.

The condition is called neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Experts don’t consider it to be addiction, which, by definition, means a person persists in compulsive drug use despite terrible consequences. By the same logic, NAS is also a misnomer—abstaining, or just saying no, is different from experiencing the physical anguish of withdrawal. But medical experts have come to accept the NAS label because it’s less fraught with stigma than words like “addiction” and “withdrawal.”

In some cases the mothers themselves are in recovery. They didn’t misuse opioids during pregnancy but took methadone or buprenorphine, the frontline medications for treating opioid addiction. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends their use during pregnancy despite the risk of NAS, for the obvious reason that sobriety is safer and healthier for a woman than shooting heroin or popping painkillers or trying to go cold turkey on her own. It’s also much better for her child. But encouraging as it is, the growing use of medication-assisted addiction treatment means that even when the opioid crisis eases, hospitals like Cabell Huntington will continue to be swamped with babies in withdrawal.

To manage the condition, most hospitals use an assessment tool developed at the height of the heroin outbreak in the 1970s. Babies are rated every four hours on the severity of 31 symptoms, including excessive crying, sweating, tremors, and frequent yawning. The scores help doctors determine whether to put babies on methadone or other medication. In most cases the scores support drug therapy. Now some researchers are challenging that approach.

“It’s archaic,” says Elisha Wachman, a neonatologist at Boston Medical Center and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine. “What ends up happening is that babies get overmedicated.” Too often, she says, they experience withdrawal from their treatment, which prolongs their misery and their hospital stay.

A handful of researchers around the country are revamping NAS treatment to rely less on medication and more on parental bonding. Wachman has abandoned the old score sheet for assessing the babies. “I couldn’t care less how many times they yawn,” she says. Instead, she evaluates them on just three measures: eating, sleeping, and being consoled. Rather than transfer babies to an ICU or a specialty unit, Boston Medical Center keeps them with their moms throughout their stay. Wachman encourages the women to breastfeed and clutch their babies skin to skin. One hundred fifty volunteers—most of them medical students and hospital employees—put in two-hour shifts as cuddlers. The waiting list to hold babies has 200 names.

Before the hospital changed its approach, 86 percent of the babies with NAS it treated received medication. Now it’s 30 percent. The babies generally spend nine days in the hospital, down from 19 days under the old protocol. The average cost of a hospital stay for a baby with NAS is $19,655 at Boston Medical Center, compared to a national average of $67,000.

Wachman says sound treatment for the babies must go hand in hand with compassionate, comprehensive care for their mothers. The medical center runs a prenatal clinic for women with addiction. The obstetricians prescribe buprenorphine and prepare women for the possibility that their babies will have NAS. The clinic also offers counseling, social services, psychiatric help, peer support, and education about infant care. “When the moms come in to deliver, they’re in the best shape they can be,” Wachman says. In July the medical center opened a clinic that provides pediatric care for babies born with NAS and addiction services for their mothers.

It’s not clear how opioid exposure affects long-term brain development. Surprisingly little research has been done, and most of it predates the current crisis and the widespread use of highly potent synthetics, such as fentanyl. Some studies show subtle cognitive and behavioral differences among children who were exposed to opioids before birth, but the problems are less severe than the intellectual and attention deficits associated with fetal alcohol exposure. The studies don’t answer a key question: Do the neurodevelopment issues stem from drug exposure or poverty or other chronic stresses? Some researchers believe that social factors and a stable environment are bigger influences on a child’s future than NAS.

“We keep hearing about the babies, and that it is important, but there needs to be much more of a focus on women and making sure they’re taken care of well,” says Uma Reddy, a maternal-fetal medicine expert at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Mass Tort Nexus will provide updates on the Infant NAS MDL request to the JPML as well the Opiate Prescription MDL 2804 on a daily basis.

For the most up to date information on all MDL dockets and related mass torts visit www.masstortnexus.com and review our mass tort briefcases and professional site MDL briefcases.

To obtain our free newsletters that contain real time mass tort updates, visit www.masstortnexus.com/news and sign up for free access.

 

 

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Motion for New Infant/NAS Opioid Dependant MDL 2872 Filed With JPML on September 20, 2018

A group of plaintiff attorneys have filed a new motion for consolidation of an “Infant/NAS Opioid Addicted Baby MDL” to be separate from the existing Opiate Prescription MDL 2804 due to the lack of “individuals/baby cases” being offered a prominent role in MDL 2804

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 20, 2018 Motion and Brief in Support Filed With the Joint Panel on Multidistrict Litigation:

BEFORE THE UNITED STATES JUDICIAL PANEL ON MULTIDISTRICT LITIGATION

IN RE: CHILDREN BORN                                                           MDL – 2872

OPIOID-DEPENDENT

 

MOTION FOR TRANSFER OF ACTIONS PURSUANT TO 28 U.S.C. §

1407 FOR COORDINATED OR CONSOLIDATED PRETRIAL PROCEEDINGS

 

Plaintiffs[1] respectfully move that the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (“Panel”), pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1407 and Rule 6.2 of the Rules of Procedure of the Panel, transfer the actions on behalf of children born opioid-dependent listed in the attached Schedule of Actions and subsequent tag-along actions to a separate MDL before the Southern District of West Virginia.  Alternatively, Plaintiffs request transfer to the Southern District of Illinois.  Transfer is appropriate for the following reasons:

  1. Movants seek transfer and coordination or consolidation of all cases filed on behalf of opioiddependent infants into a separate MDL for the reasons laid out in the Doyle plaintiffs’ recently filed Motion to Vacate CTO-47 (JPML 2804 Rec. Doc. 2398).[2] As discussed therein, the cases of the opioiddependent infants are unique, and further, Movants have grave concerns that the due process rights of opioid-dependent infants are not being protected in MDL 2804 and that the interests of the governmental and corporate parties represented by the MDL leadership are fundamentally in conflict with those of these infants. The question now posed to the Panel, argued in the accompanying brief in support of this Motion, is not whether these cases should be held outside of the MDL as presently structured (they must be), but whether they should be consolidated in a separate MDL.
  2. Presently, there are substantially similar class action suits filed on behalf of opioid-dependent infants pending in the Southern District of West Virginia, the Southern District of Ohio, as well as eight cases currently caught up in MDL 2804 in the Northern District of Ohio. Undersigned counsel anticipates that several more substantially similar opioid-dependent infant class action suits will be filed across the country in the coming months.
  3. The actions on behalf of the opioid-dependent infants assert substantially similar claims and seek substantially similar relief. These suits seek to establish a fund for medical monitoring, damages related to acute neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) treatment and long-term treatment of these innocent victims of the Opioid Crisis.
  4. The convenience of the courts, witnesses, parties, and counsel will all be served by transfer of these cases to the Southern District of West Virginia, or in the alternative, the Southern District of

Illinois.

  1. Absent transfer, the opioid-dependent infants’ unique interests will remain unprotected and these young victims risk losing the opportunity to achieve a productive adulthood.
  2. In support of this Motion, Movants file:
    1. A Brief supporting their Motion;
    2. A numbered Schedule of Actions providing (i) the complete name of each action involved, listing the full name of each party included as such on the district court’s docket sheet; (ii) the district court and division where each action is pending; (iii) the civil action number of each action; and, (iv) the name of the Judge assigned to each action;
    3. A copy of all complaints and docket sheets for all actions listed on the schedule;
    4. Statement Regarding Oral Argument; and,
    5. Proof of Service.

WHEREFORE, Movants respectfully request that the Panel grant their motion and transfer these cases, for coordinated and consolidated pre-trial proceedings, to the Southern District of West Virginia. Alternatively, Plaintiffs request transfer to the Southern District of Illinois.

Respectfully submitted,

/s/ Scott R. Bickford

MARTZELL, BICKFORD & CENTOLA

Scott R. Bickford (LA 1165)

Spencer R. Doody (LA 27795)

338 Lafayette Street

New Orleans, LA 70130

Telephone: 504-581-9065 Facsimile: 504-581-7635 sbickford@mbfirm.com srd@mbfirm.com

usdcndoh@mbfirm.com

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE

             I HEREBY CERTIFY that on this 19th day of September, 2018, a true and correct copy of the foregoing has been electronically filed with the Clerk of Court using the CM/ECF system, which provides an electronic service notification to all counsel of record registered as CM/ECF users.

/s/Scott Bickford___________________________

Scott Bickford

 

[1] Movants are: Deric Rees and Ceonda Rees, individually and as next friend and guardian of Baby T.W.B. on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Illinois Class); Darren and Elena Flanagan, individually and as adoptive parents and next friends of Baby K.L.F., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Tennessee Class); Rachel Wood, individually and as next friend and adopted mother of Baby O.W., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Missouri Class); Melissa Ambrosio, individually and as next friend of Baby G.A., and on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (California Class); Shannon Hunt, individually and as next friend of Baby S.J., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Maryland Class); Bobbi Lou Moore on behalf of Baby R.R.C., and all other similarly situated (West Virginia Class); Walter and Virginia Salmons, individually and as the next friend or guardian of Minor W.D. and on behalf of all others similarly situated (National Class).

[2] All arguments in Motion to Vacate CTO-47 (JPML 2804 Rec. Doc. 2398) are adopted in support of this Motion.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

BEFORE THE UNITED STATES JUDICIAL PANEL ON MULTIDISTRICT LITIGATION

IN RE: CHILDREN BORN                       MDL – _________

OPIOID-DEPENDENT

 

BRIEF IN SUPPORT OF PLAINTIFFS’ MOTION FOR TRANSFER OF

ACTIONS PURSUANT TO 28 U.S.C. § 1407 FOR COORDINATED OR

CONSOLIDATED PRETRIAL PROCEEDINGS

Plaintiffs[1] respectfully move that the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (“Panel”), pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1407 and Rule 6.2 of the Rules of Procedure of the Panel, transfer the actions on behalf of children born opioid-dependent listed in the attached Schedule of Actions and subsequent tag-along actions to a separate MDL before the Southern District of West Virginia.; alternatively, Plaintiffs request transfer to the Southern District of Illinois.

I.        Children Born Opioid-Dependent Need A Separate MDL From MDL 2804

Movants seek transfer and coordination or consolidation of all cases filed on behalf of opioiddependent infants into a new MDL for the reasons laid out in the Doyle plaintiffs’ recently filed Motion to Vacate CTO-47 (JPML 2804 Rec. Doc. 2398).[2] As discussed therein, Movants bring unique claims on behalf of opioid-dependent infants, distinct from the claims of the government and corporate plaintiffs in MDL 2804. These suits bring direct claims on behalf of innocent victims for past and future damages suffered, in contrast to claims for reimbursement. Plaintiffs’ claims do not wholly sound in public nuisance but also in state medical monitoring and product liability causes of action. Further, Movants have grave concerns that the due process rights of opioid-dependent infants are not being protected in MDL 2804 and that the interests of the governmental and corporate parties represented by the MDL leadership are fundamentally in conflict with those of these infants.

Movants established in their Motion to Vacate that concerns for due process, conflicts of interest, and the protection owed to children under the law compel this Panel to exclude such claims from MDL 2804 as it is presently structured.  Movants have also established that despite their counsel’s numerous attempts to address these concerns with the leadership of the MDL, the status quo remains.  Absent a structural change within the MDL, the question before the Panel is not whether these cases should be held outside of the MDL (they must be), but whether they should be consolidated in their own MDL.

The prospect of a separate MDL for a non-governmental plaintiff group was explicitly and favorably discussed at this Panel’s November 30, 2017 hearing:[3]

JUDGE BREYER: Well, there’s another option that maybe your colleagues can address for you which is they all go to Judge X. There are common issues. Judge X conducts the discovery with respect to the common issues. And Judge X has the option of addressing the panel, one way or another, or the lawyers do, to create another MDL with this group or that group because the issues aren’t really amenable to the MDL that they are in.

  1. TELLIS: I think that is a fine idea.

JUDGE BREYER: You like that idea?

  1. TELLIS: I like that idea.

JUDGE BREYER: I’m glad you came up with that idea.

JUDGE VANCE: It’s not infeasible to think there could be a personal injury MDL or a third-party payor.

It has become abundantly clear that MDL 2804 is not amenable to the issues affecting opioid dependent infants, making a separate MDL for this group of innocent, injured plaintiffs necessary.

Presently, there are substantially similar opioid-dependent infant class action suits pending in the Southern District of West Virginia, the Southern District of Ohio, as well as eight cases currently caught up in MDL 2804 in the Northern District of Ohio. These state by state class actions filed to date conservatively represent approximately 40% of the children born opioid-dependent in the country. Undersigned counsel anticipates that several other substantially similar opioid-dependent infant class action suits will be filed across the country in the coming months. The actions on behalf of the opioid-dependent infants assert substantially similar claims and seek substantially similar relief.

These suits seek to establish a fund for medical monitoring, damages related to Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) treatment and long-term treatment of these innocent victims of the Opioid Crisis.

The medical issues involved in the opioid-dependent infant cases and the relief sought are distinct from those of the governmental and corporate cases of MDL 2804.  The unique issues of these infants’ cases require discovery to be undertaken in areas including the following:

  • Studies regarding the effect of Defendants’ opioid products upon the health of pregnant mothers and their children in utero, and effects after birth.
  • Knowledge regarding the effects of methadone (and other addiction treatment drugs) taken by pregnant mothers on their children in utero.
  • Studies regarding which medications are appropriate for pregnant mothers dealing with opioid addiction.
  • Knowledge of the diversionary opioid market’s impact on pregnant mothers.
  • Discovery relevant to Movants’ products liability claims.

 

To the extent there is overlap of factual allegations and common issues regarding the opioid drug manufacturers’ and distributors’ conduct between the opioid-dependent infant lawsuits and the suits in MDL 2804, Movants envision that discovery in the infants’ MDL would be coordinated with Judge Polster in MDL 2804 in accord with 28 U.S.C. § 1407.

Absent transfer to a separate MDL, the opioid-dependent infants’ unique interests will remain unprotected and these innocent young victims risk losing the opportunity to achieve a productive adulthood.

II. The Southern District of West Virginia is the Most Appropriate Forum for Transfer and Consolidation or Coordination

 

The Southern District of West Virginia, where the suit of Bobbi Lou Moore on behalf of Baby R.R.C. v. Purdue Pharma L.P., No. 2:18-cv-01231 (S.D.W. Va.) is currently pending, is the most appropriate forum for Multidistrict Litigation. Southern West Virginia is the epicenter of the Opioid Crisis– where it began and where its most profound impacts are being felt. West Virginia has some of the highest rates of fetal opioid exposure and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) in the country.

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR) recently released data for

2017 showing the overall incidence rate of NAS was 50.6 cases per 1,000 live births (5.06%) for West

Virginia residents, with the rate as high as 106.6 cases per 1,000 live births (10.66%) in one county.[4]  According to the CDC, there are many more opioid prescriptions than people in West Virginia– 138 prescriptions for every 100 people.[5] A congressional investigation revealed that from 2008 to 2012, pharmaceutical distributors sent more than 780 million pills of hydrocodone and oxycodone to West Virginia, a state with only 1.8 million people.[6] Southern West Virginia was especially hard hit: 20.8 million opioid pills were shipped from 2006 to 2016 to Williamson (population 2,900).[7] One pharmacy in Kermit (population 400) ranked 22nd in the U.S. in the number of hydrocodone pills it received in 2006.[8] The grave impact of this flood of prescription opioids on southern West Virginia and the children born there cannot be overstated.

The Courts of the Southern District of West Virginia have a proven track record in administering Multidistrict Litigation, as demonstrated by the Pelvic Repair System Products Liability Litigation. The Southern District of West Virginia provides a well-prepared, well-staffed, and overall top-notch staff and Clerk’s office. As discussed below, the District’s judges have a wealth of experience in complex litigation, particularly pharmaceutical litigation. The convenience of the courts, witnesses, parties, and counsel will all be served by transfer of these cases to the Southern District of West Virginia.

Judge Robert C. Chambers has the requisite experience to manage this complex litigation.  He previously served as Chief Judge for this District from 2012-2017, and has presided over 500 cases involving pharmaceutical companies.  Judge Chambers is currently presiding over products liability actions involving claims against the manufacturer of prescription anticoagulant drugs.[9]  He has also presided over a case featuring complex pharmaceutical litigation, W. Virginia ex rel. Morrisey v. Pfizer, Inc., 969 F. Supp. 2d 476, 479 (S.D.W. Va. 2013).  Prior to being appointed to the federal bench by President Clinton, Judge Chambers was in private practice in Charleston for twenty years, and served as legal counsel to the West Virginia State Senate.

Senior Judge David A. Faber, appointed to the federal bench in 1991 by President George H.W. Bush, served as Chief Judge at the Southern District of West Virginia from 2002 to 2007. He has served as a Senior Judge in the district since 2008. He has handled 79 cases involving pharmaceuticals, including several opioid cases.[10] Senior Judge Faber also presided over a case involving medical products liability.[11] Prior to becoming a federal judge, Senior Judge Faber worked in both private practice and served in the military as a JAG, and achieved the rank of Colonel. He attended Yale for law school where he was a National Law Scholar, and holds an L.L.M. degree from the University of Virginia.

Chief Judge Thomas E.  Johnston in the Charleston Division has over a decade of experience as a federal judge. He oversees some of the suite of cases collected in the MDL related to the Pelvic Repair System Products Liability Litigation.[12]  Chief Judge Johnston has extensive experience presiding over medical cases, including 216 cases involving health care, and 28 cases specifically involving pharmaceuticals, as well as products liability claims.[13] He had previously served as U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of West Virginia from 2001 to 2006 before being appointed to the bench by President George W. Bush.

In the alternative, Movants would propose transfer and consolidation in the Southern District of Illinois before the Judge Staci M. Yandle. Judge Yandle was appointed to the federal bench in 2014 after an illustrious career in private practice and a distinguished record of public service, including serving on the Illinois Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights. This Panel has previously commended the Southern District of Illinois as convenient due in part to its geographically central location.[14]

III.     Conclusion

For the above-stated reasons and the reasons stated in the Motion to Vacate filed by the Doyle plaintiffs, Movants respectfully request that the Panel transfer the actions on behalf of opioid dependent infants recited on the attached Schedule and all subsequently filed tag-along cases for coordinated and consolidated pretrial proceedings in a separate MDL in the Southern District of West Virginia. Alternatively, Movants request transfer to the Southern District of Illinois, and assignment to Judge Staci M. Yandle.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

/s/ Scott R. Bickford

MARTZELL, BICKFORD & CENTOLA

Scott R. Bickford (LA 1165)

Spencer R. Doody (LA 27795)

338 Lafayette Street

New Orleans, LA 70130

Telephone: 504-581-9065 Facsimile: 504-581-7635 sbickford@mbfirm.com srd@mbfirm.com

usdcndoh@mbfirm.com

 

 

/s/ Celeste Brustowicz

COOPER LAW FIRM, LLC

Celeste Brustowicz (LA 16835)

Barry J. Cooper, Jr. (LA 27202)

Stephen H. Wussow (LA 35391)

Victor Cobb (LA 36830)

1525 Religious Street

New Orleans, LA 70130

Telephone: 504-399-0009 Cbrustowicz@sch-llc.com

swussow@sch-llc.com

 

 

/s/ Kevin W. Thompson

THOMPSON BARNEY LAW FIRM

Kevin W. Thompson David R. Barney, Jr.

2030 Kanawha Boulevard, East

Charleston, WV 25311

Telephone: 304-343-4401

Facsimile: 304-343-4405

Kwthompsonwv@gmail.com

 

 

/s/ James F. Clayborne

CLAYBORNE, SABO & WAGNER, LLP

Sen. James F. Clayborne (IL 45627)

525 West Main Street, Suite 105

Belleville, Il 62220

Telephone:  618-239-0187

Facsimile:  618-416-7556

jclayborne@cswlawllp.com

 

 

/s/ Jack W. Harang

LAW OFFICES OF JACK W. HARANG

Jack W. Harang (LA 15083)

2433 Taffy Drive

Kenner, LA 70065 Telephone: 504-810-4734

jwharang@gmail.com

 

 

/s/ Kent Harrison Robbins

THE LAW OFFICES OF KENT HARRISON

ROBBINS, P.A.

Kent Harrison Robbins (FL 275484)

242 Northeast 27th Street

Miami, FL 33137

Telephone: 305-532-0500

Facsimile: 305-531-0150

Primary: Khr@khrlawoffices.com

Secondary: ereyes@khrlawoffices.com

Tertiary: assistant@khrlawoffices.com

 

 

/s/ Donald Creadore

THE CREADORE LAW FIRM, P.C.

Donald Creadore (NY 2090702)

450 Seventh Avenue – 1408

New York, NY 10123

Telephone: 212-355-7200

Facsimile: 212-583-0412

Primary: donald@creadorelawfirm.com

Secondary: donald@aol.com

 

 

/s/ Warren Perrin

PERRIN, LANDRY, deLAUNAY

Warren Perrin

251 La Rue France

  1. O. Box 53597

Lafayette, LA 70505

Telephone: 337-233-5832

[1] Movants are: Deric Rees and Ceonda Rees, individually and as next friend and guardian of Baby T.W.B. on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Illinois Class); Darren and Elena Flanagan, individually and as adoptive parents and next friends of Baby K.L.F., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Tennessee Class); Rachel Wood, individually and as next friend and adopted mother of Baby O.W., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Missouri Class); Melissa Ambrosio, individually and as next friend of Baby G.A., and on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (California Class); Shannon Hunt, individually and as next friend of Baby S.J., on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated (Maryland Class); Bobbi Lou Moore on behalf of Baby R.R.C., and all other similarly situated (West Virginia Class); Walter and Virginia Salmons, individually and as the next friend or guardian of Minor W.D. and on behalf of all others similarly situated (National Class).

[2] All arguments in Motion to Vacate CTO-47 (JPML 2804 Rec. Doc. 2398) are adopted in support of this Motion.

[3] JPML 2804 Rec. Doc. No. 382 at 16-17, Transcript of November 30, 2017 Hearing.

[4] https://dhhr.wv.gov/News/2018/Pages/DHHR-Releases-Neonatal-Abstinence-Syndrome-Data-for-2017-.aspx

[5] CDC, “Opioid Use Disorder Documented at Delivery Hospitalization – United States 1999-2014,” August 10, 2018, at 2. “West Virginia, for example, had a prescribing rate estimated at 138 opioid prescriptions per 100 persons in 2012, suggesting that individual persons might receive more than one opioid prescription per year.”

[6] https://www.usnews.com/news/politics/articles/2018-05-08/hill-panel-probing-opioids-abuse-targets-distributorfirms

[7] Id.

[8] Id.

[9] Knight v. Boehringer Ingelheim Pharm., Inc., 2018 WL 3037442 (S.D.W. Va. June 19, 2018).

[10] See, e.g., City of Huntington v. AmerisourceBergen Drug Corp., No. CV 3:17-01362, 2017 WL 3317300 (S.D.W. Va. Aug. 3, 2017); The Town of Clendenin, West Virginia v. AmerisourceBergen Drug Corporation et al., No. 2:18-CV-01284, (S.D.W. Va.

Sept. 10, 2018); Adkins v. Purdue Pharma, L.P. et al., No. 18-CV-00477, (S.D.W. Va. Mar. 23, 2018).

[11] Walker v. Medtronic, Inc., No. CIV.A. 2:07-00317, 2010 WL 4822135 (S.D.W. Va. Nov. 24, 2010), aff’d, 670 F.3d 569 (4th Cir. 2012).

[12] See MDL No. 2187, In Re C. R. Bard, Inc., Pelvic Repair System Products Liability Litigation.

[13] See, e.g., Raab v. Smith & Nephew, Inc., 150 F. Supp. 3d 671 (S.D.W. Va. 2015).

[14] In re: Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) Prod. Liab. Litig., 883 F. Supp. 2d 1355, 1356 (U.S. Jud. Pan. Mult. Lit. 2012) (“The Southern District of Illinois’ geographically central location and accessibility also commend it for this nationwide products liability litigation.”).

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